"make a copy of ..." and "run off a copy of ..."

Ume

Banned
Japanese
He made three copies of the document.
He ran up three copies of the document.


These two are grammatically correct, aren't they? Do they mean exactly the same thing?
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    He made three copies of the document.
    He ran up three copies of the document.


    These two are grammatically correct, aren't they? Do they mean exactly the same thing?
    In my experience, the phrase is "ran off," stemming from the use of rotary presses and duplicators.

    We do talk, however, about people who run up large bills on credit cards, etc.
     

    Ume

    Banned
    Japanese
    I made a typo. Not "ran up" but "ran off."

    He made three copies of the document.
    He ran off three copies of the document.

    These two are grammatically correct, aren't they? Do they mean exactly the same thing?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Ran off" means the same as "made" when talking about printed material, but is rather colloquial.

    I'm not sure it's as popular a phrase as it once once.
     
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