(Make a) deposit to, at, with, on or for

Discussion in 'English Only' started by AskLang, Mar 27, 2010.

  1. AskLang Senior Member

    Manila
    Filipino
    I am admittedly not good at prepositions as with a lot more others. The prepositions I have written in bold are the ones I doubt in this particular context. Could you please make clarifications as to what I should have used instead? Thanks!

    Context:
    You have paid a certain amount as deposit to a store for an item you wish to buy.

    At some points you refer to your deposit and say:

    I still have a deposit with you.
    I deposited to you last week.
    I have deposited on an item at a particular store.
    What happens to my deposit with you?

    Likewise, do I understand it right when I say:

    You make a deposit at a bank (because it is at the bank where you are at when you do so) and into/on your account. (?)
     
  2. tm2111327 Senior Member

    Chicago, USA
    English - United States
    I would call this a "down payment", not a deposit. Unfortunately, the sentences as you have written them don't completely make sense. You could say:
    I made a down payment (here/with you).
    I made a down payment (with you) last week.
    I have made a down payment on an item at a particular store.
    What happens to my down payment?

    Your second question is correct. You make a deposit at a bank into your account.
     
  3. AskLang Senior Member

    Manila
    Filipino
    Thanks tm! Is -

    I still have a downpayment (meaning money) with you.

    also a possible option for my first sentence?
     
  4. tm2111327 Senior Member

    Chicago, USA
    English - United States
    It's possible, but it sounds a little strange to me because we usually use "to make" with down payment.
     
  5. AskLang Senior Member

    Manila
    Filipino
    How do you say it then? Do you refer to it as simply "money"?

    Thanks again!
     

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