make a mountain out of / over a molehill

rebecca13594

Member
english
how do i say a moutain out of a molehill:confused: french i have wanted to know for a while.
rebecca:thumbsup:

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  • Mycall

    Senior Member
    France French
    french4beth said:
    I found "faire une montagne d'une taupinière" - is this expression used often? :confused:
    Yes, we say "faire une montagne" but we don't use "taupinière". I only heard about: "(se) faire une montagne d'un (petit) rien" ou "faire une montagne de pas grand-chose" ou encore "se faire un monde de rien du tout" (when you are worried stiff about some upcoming event).
     

    Orto

    Member
    FRANCE
    I rarely heard this expression . Usually , we say something like "on ne va pas s'en faire une montagne" . funny expression though :)
     

    Prongsmate

    New Member
    French, Canada
    [...]

    Antidote also suggests the following expression for "make a mountain out of a molehill": « faire d'une mouche un éléphant ». Definition: accorder beaucoup d'importance à une chose insignifiante...

    « En faire une montagne » means « exagérer ».

    Voilà!
     
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    catch22s

    Member
    FRENCH
    Hello, can the idiom 'make a mountain out of a molehill' make sense in the following sentence?
    'so the advertiser is not making a mountain out of a molehill when he praises the benefits of milk'
    This sentence was written by one of my students who wants to say that the advertiser is not lying or exaggerating because milk benefits have been proved scientifically. I don't think it is working in that context. What would you say?
    Thanks in advance.
     

    bobepine

    Senior Member
    Canada, English & French
    I have always heard it used to describe overstating a negative, and online sources seem to support this view.

    I would tend to agree with you that it is not used correctly, but wait for other opinions.
     

    rosalind

    Senior Member
    USA, American English
    No, I don't think it works. This phrase is normally used to suggest that someone has taken a small complaint or problem, and is treating it as if it were much more serious. That is, the "molehill" is usually a negative thing.

    In this context, your student simply means that the advertiser has not exaggerated something that is positive to begin with. So it's not an ideal choice of phrase.
     

    dasubergeek

    Senior Member
    English - US; French - CH
    "Make a mountain out of a molehill" doesn't mean to exaggerate facts, it means to exaggerate a problem. So if you get a little cut from a paper and you start screaming about how you need the paramedics, you are making a mountain out of a molehill. Or if maybe you come home for the first time with un verre dans le nez, and your wife screams at you about what a terrible drunk you are, she is making a mountain out of a molehill.
     

    Yamame

    Senior Member
    French - Metropolitan France
    French usually says :

    -faire (toute) une montagne *de quelque chose*
    -faire (tout) un fromage *de quelque chose*

    for "making a moutain out of a molehill" *of smthg*

    So "she made a mountain out of a molehill" without a complement is "elle en a fait tout un fromage/une montagne", "en" being a non-stated "of smthg".
    Hope it helps.
     
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    dasubergeek

    Senior Member
    English - US; French - CH
    I'm snickering about the idea "faire tout un fromage des bénéfices du lait..."

    In French too you couldn't really use "en faire tout un fromage" about exaggerating something positive.
     

    Lsmid

    Member
    English- England
    Hi,

    I am trying to say the government did not need to make such a big deal out of it, or the government did not need to make such a mountain out of a molehill.

    Can I say this:
    le gouvernement ne devrait pas faire une telle montagne??

    Thanks!!
     

    LART01

    Senior Member
    French-France
    Hi,

    I am trying to say the government did not need to make such a big deal out of it, or the government did not need to make such a mountain out of a molehill.

    Can I say this:
    le gouvernement ne devrait pas en faire une telle montagne??

    quite!:)

    Thanks!!
     

    lyli13

    New Member
    français
    je vous remercie beaucoup. ca veut donc dire " faire d'une montagne une taupinière" si j'ai bien compris. Avez-vous une idée pour traduire cela par une expression française? Sinon dois-je traduire mot à mot mon titre par cette expression?
     

    Mikestaba

    New Member
    English - England
    Bonjour tout le monde,

    J’essaie de traduire cette idiome de l’anglais vers le français, à savoir : « to make a mountain over a mole hill ». Nous l’utilisons en anglais pour décrire une personne qui exagère beaucoup, qui fait croire que bien plus de choses se sont passées au lieu d’expliquer les faits réels qui se sont déroulés.

    Si on le traduit littéralement, on a « faire une montagne sur une taupinière » mais je ne crois pas que ça se dise. Alors, est-ce que vous avez des suggestions ?

    Merci en avance !
     

    Procol

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi

    I've never heard "make a mountain over a molehill", rather "make mountains out of molehills"... Interesting variation perhaps. There is an expression in French that goes "faire une montagne d'un rien". Another common expression is "faire tout un plat".
     

    SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    The idiom is actually To make a mountain out of a molehill, which literally translated would be Faire une montagne d'une taupinière.

    The best translation I found is: Faire une montagne d'un rien.
     
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    joelooc

    Senior Member
    French (Provence)
    Il existe une variante assez vulgaire impliquant une pendule (voir ce mot dans WR)
     
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