"make a stand" versus "take/adopt a stance"

pickup

Senior Member
" España, español"

Hi

In these particular two sentences below, in my opinión it would be possible to use the phrases "make a stand" and "take a stance"as equivalents.

Thegovernment was determined to make a stand/take/adopt a stance against all formsof terrorism.
Hefelt the need to make a stand/take a stance against racism.

Can any of you confirm my point?

Regards

pickup
 
  • JustKate

    Senior Member
    They don't mean the same thing, at least not to me. They sound like they ought to, but they don't.

    "Make a stand" means "Hold firm against something or someone." "Take a stance" means "adopt a position," meaning a philosophical or political position. Someone who "makes a stand" is doing something a lot stronger and more active than someone who "takes a stance."
     

    pickup

    Senior Member
    " España, español"
    Justkate

    Could you please specify what actions in particular would be taken in both sentences?

    Could you give me the answers to the left of the three dots below?

    1.Sentence:
    a.make a stand against all forms of terrorism...
    b.take a stance against all forms of terrorism...

    2. Sentence:
    a.make a stand against racism...
    b- take a stance against racism...

    Thank you for your answers

    pickup
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    You can either "take a stance" or "make a stand" against either terrorism or racism. It depends on what you mean.

    If you "take a stance," you make your opinion known.

    If you "make a stand," your role tends to be active and assertive. The idiom comes from the military, where it refers to holding ground (that is, not retreating) in the face of the enemy. You don't have to literally face an enemy with a weapon in your hand in order to make a stand, but the idiom means more than just stating that your opinion.

    If I told people I was against racism, I'd be "taking a stance" against racism. If I did something more active, such as stepping in and defending someone who was being subjected to racism, I'd be "making a stand."

    There are gray areas in which it might be difficult to determine which idiom qualifies, but as I explained, "making a stand" is much stronger, and implies a greater degree of risk, than does "taking a stance."

    Does that help?
     

    rickqin

    Member
    Mandarin
    You can either "take a stance" or "make a stand" against either terrorism or racism. It depends on what you mean.

    If you "take a stance," you make your opinion known.

    If you "make a stand," your role tends to be active and assertive. The idiom comes from the military, where it refers to holding ground (that is, not retreating) in the face of the enemy. You don't have to literally face an enemy with a weapon in your hand in order to make a stand, but the idiom means more than just stating that your opinion.

    If I told people I was against racism, I'd be "taking a stance" against racism. If I did something more active, such as stepping in and defending someone who was being subjected to racism, I'd be "making a stand."

    There are gray areas in which it might be difficult to determine which idiom qualifies, but as I explained, "making a stand" is much stronger, and implies a greater degree of risk, than does "taking a stance."

    Does that help?
    Wow, that's really a subtle difference between them. Nice explanation and examples.
     
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