make acquaintance with <> get acquainted with

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Bigtime

Senior Member
Arabic
I want you to make Acquaintance with John.
I want you to get acquainted with John.

Do both sentences mean the same?

Thanks.
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Not quite. The first sentence means simply to make friends with John. The second means get to know John more intimately - his habits, his thoughts, his beliefs, his likes and dislikes etc.

    You could also say 'Make John's acquaintance', which means the same as the first sentence.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    In the first sentence, it should properly be 'make the acquaintance of John', which really does mean the same as 'make John's acquaintance'.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    In the first sentence, it should properly be 'make the acquaintance of John', which really does mean the same as 'make John's acquaintance'.
    My teacher introduce a way to say if "you don't make experience at work at least you can see a lot of people and know more about the world. He said:

    If you cannot make experience, you can make acquaintance. I was wondering it was idiomatic or sounds natural.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    He said:

    If you cannot make experience, you can make acquaintance. I was wondering it was idiomatic or sounds natural.
    Whatever it is supposed to mean, I am afraid it does not work, because we do not say 'make experience'.
    Those words woud only come together in expressions such as 'make experience tell', which is advice you might give to an older person in competition with a younger.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Whatever it is supposed to mean, I am afraid it does not work, because we do not say 'make experience'.
    Those words woud only come together in expressions such as 'make experience tell', which is advice you might give to an older person in competition with a younger.
    How about the expression "make acquaintance"?

    "If you cannot make experience, you can make acquaintance."
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    "If you cannot make experience, you can make acquaintance."
    Neither part of that sentence works. For 'make experience', see above.

    As regards 'make acquaintance', we do not use that on its own either.
    We talk about 'making the acquaintance of' someone. That means 'getting to know' the person.
    You might say that in a job you can make the acquaintance of other people.

    You could also say that in a job you can make acquaintances. In this case, the acquaintances (countable) are the actual people.

    In the case of a very busy person who meets many people but has no time to build relationships, you might say:
    'He has many acquaintances but no friends'.
     
    Last edited:

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Neither part of that sentence works. For 'make experience', see above.

    As regards 'make acquaintance', we do not use that on its own either.
    We talk about 'making the acquaintance of' someone. That means 'getting to know' the person.
    You might say that in a job you can make the acquaintance of other people.
    I see. Thank you very much.
     
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