make for

Eastt

Senior Member
Georgian
Hello all

"They made for a pretty portrait, the proud old woman all in green surrounded by the little girls robed and veiled in white, armored in their innocence"

Is emboldened part correct in this sentence?

Thanks in advance
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, it's a fairly common construction, with or without the word "for". It just means they all looked good together, like a painting.

    The young couple make a pretty picture
    The King and Queen rode in with their son Geric at their side and they made a pretty picture as well
    The shadow of the bough and its appendages on the wall, and arching over on the ceiling, made a pretty picture
    (from a book of 1824!)

    There's also an expression "pretty as a picture".
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If you think about it too hard, the "for" does seem odd. So don't think about it too hard.;)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    If you think about it too hard, the "for" does seem odd. So don't think about it too hard.;)
    Yes. I nearly suggested deleting it, then thought better of it!

    MAKE FOR (phrasal verb):
    Tend to result in or be received as (a particular thing) — Job descriptions never make for exciting reading.

    MAKE FOR
    to bring about or keep going — A calm manner in a police officer makes for fewer arguments.
     
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