Make/Get someone drunk

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Jigen

Senior Member
Italian
Both make and get can be used with an object and an adjective,do these strucures have the same meaning.

1)Bob's behaviour makes/gets me angry!
2)Harry's friends made/got him drunk last Sunday.
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    I feel "makes" is better in the first and "got" in the second.

    You could rephrase the second to say Harry's friends made/got him driunk last Sunday. (But it changes the meaning a bit - he may not have got drunk.)
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Barque is right: behaviour makes me angry; his friends got him drunk.

    These are just the most usual way to express these.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    So can we say "My friends like getting me angry"?
    It would be more usual to say "My friends like making me angry?" It is a (probably) direct action.
    Your friends make you angry by saying mean things to you.
    Your friends might get you angry by sending you links to videos that make you angry.
     

    Jigen

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ok,well is there a rule regarding the use of get or make in these cases? As they sound quite similar to me....
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    1) Bob's behaviour [behavior in AE] makes/gets me angry!
    2) Harry's friends made/got him drunk last Sunday.
    Either "makes" or "gets" works in sentence (1), but only "got" is right in sentence (2).

    Is there a rule regarding the use of get or make in these cases?
    To my knowledge, no. As you've probably realized by now, there are very few reliable rules in English.
     

    Jigen

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I've found the following definitions in the OALD

    make somebody/something/yourself + adj.to cause somebody/something to be or become something

    get somebody/something + adj.to reach a particular state or condition; to make somebody/something/yourself reach a particular state or condition

    Their uses are quiete similar!
     

    Flora1229

    New Member
    German
    Hey guys! I am thinking of getting a new tattoo but since i am not a native english speaker i wanted to ask you first about your opinion.
    My idea is:

    You cant make me drunk.
    You cant make me sober.

    Is this correct? What do you think?
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    It would be more usual to say "My friends like making me angry?" It is a (probably) direct action.
    Your friends make you angry by saying mean things to you.
    Your friends might get you angry by sending you links to videos that make you angry.
    Hi,
    Would you please let me know the difference in meaning between "make someone adjective" and "get someone adjective"?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Hey guys! I am thinking of getting a new tattoo but since i am not a native english speaker i wanted to ask you first about your opinion.
    My idea is:

    You cant make me drunk.
    You cant make me sober.

    Is this correct? What do you think?
    Hello Flora - welcome to the forums!

    The phrases "make me drunk" and "make me sober" are fine. But both your sentences are missing an apostrophe - it's can't, not cant;).
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    You can't make me drunk = You can't make me drink so much that I get drunk. The speaker may not drink at all.
    You can't get me drunk = It suggests that the speaker might be willing to drink, but won't be persuaded to drink so much that he/she gets drunk.

    I don't see much difference between "make me sober" and "get me sober". I'd say "make" is more likely to be used, or: You can't sober me up.
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Thank you for your helpful reply Barque.:)

    I'd also like to hear your thoughts on the following.

    You can't make me drink.
    You can't get me to drink.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    "Make" sounds a little more direct or forceful than "get" which implies some coaxing. But without context I don't see much more difference than that.
     
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