make someone go out

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Joseph A

Senior Member
Kurdish
Hello everyone,
Is there a transitive verb for "make someone go out"?
Teacher to student:
If you don't behave well next time, I will make you go out.
Situation: When a student is rude, impolite and disturbs everyone in the class, the teacher feels unhappy with that. So he says the above sentence.
Regards,
Joseph
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    You could try eject:
    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    e•ject (i jekt),v.t.
    1. to drive or force out;
      expel, as from a place or position:The police ejected the hecklers from the meeting.
    2. to dismiss, as from office or occupancy.
    3. to evict, as from property.
    4. to throw out, as from within;
      throw off.
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    You could try eject:
    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    e•ject (i jekt),v.t.
    1. to drive or force out;
      expel, as from a place or position:The police ejected the hecklers from the meeting.
    2. to dismiss, as from office or occupancy.
    3. to evict, as from property.
    4. to throw out, as from within;
      throw off.
    Thank you so much, sdgraham.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I’m surprised by sdgraham’s suggestion; I’ve never heard a teacher use this term in this type of situation. It sounds awfully formal/jargon-y to me in this context.

    I suggest “I’ll ask you to leave” or “I’ll ask you to step out.”
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with sdg.

    The OP asked for a transitive verb meaning "make [someone] go out".

    Eject works.

    So does expel.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    sometimes it's hard to fulfill a request for "a transitive verb,"
    Ah, I see. Still, for me, "eject," while meeting the transitive-verb requirement, doesn't work on usage grounds. Joseph A needs to know that if he uses "eject," he will have opted for an unusual usage that may not even be understood by the person it is said to!

    "Expel" doesn't work for me because for me, it has a very specific meaning in the context of schools: a student who is expelled is kicked out of the school permanently. This may not apply to UK schools, of course.

    Joseph A, may I ask why you are specifically interested in a transitive verb?
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    Ah, I see. Still, for me, "eject," while meeting the transitive-verb requirement, doesn't work on usage grounds. Joseph A needs to know that if he uses "eject," he will have opted for an unusual usage that may not even be understood by the person it is said to!

    "Expel" doesn't work for me because for me, it has a very specific meaning in the context of schools: a student who is expelled is kicked out of the school permanently. This may not apply to UK schools, of course.

    Joseph A, may I ask why you are specifically interested in a transitive verb?
    Thank you, elroy.
    In my native language, there is a transitive verb similar to "make you go out",that is why I asked for a transitive verb. Here, I don't mean that the student will be kicked out of the school permanently, but the student deprived from that class/lesson as a punishment for his/her bad behaviour and has to go out. Next day or next class/lesson, he/she can come back after he/she straightens up. I'm so surprised that there is no proper transitive verb for that situation! You refused both "eject and expel".
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    There is no "need " for there to be a transitive verb. The OP is asking for transitive options.
    Thank you, Loob.
    I didn't mean the student is kicked out of school permanently. Could you please read my post #9? If your options "eject and expel" sound okay for that situation, I will use them in the future.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Thank you, Loob.
    I didn't mean the student is kicked out of school permanently. Could you please read my post #9? If your options "eject and expel" sound okay for that situation, I will use them in the future.
    So, Joseph, you're looking for a verb that means "temporarily expelled from school". Is that right?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It seems to me that learners sometimes get trapped by their own specificity.
    In this case it seems to me that it would have been better to ask for an idiomatic expression for telling a student to .leave the classroom temporarily for disruption.:
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    It seems to me that learners sometimes get trapped by their own specificity.
    In this case it seems to me that it would have been better to ask for an idiomatic expression for telling a student to .leave the classroom temporarily for disruption.:
    Thank you, sdgraham.
    When I expel that student from my class (English class), they can attend the other classes (mathematics, physics, etc ...) on the same day. That means, they are expelled only from my class. Again, "leave" isn't transitive in that usage. I think there is not any transitive verb in English for that situation. If there were, you would tell me. I bothered you. I'm sorry.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Are you looking specifically for a way to say that the student is asked to leave for the remainder of the class, as opposed to a set period of time (and then they can come back to the class)?
     

    Joseph A

    Senior Member
    Kurdish
    Are you looking specifically for a way to say that the student is asked to leave for the remainder of the class, as opposed to a set period of time (and then they can come back to the class)?
    Thanks a lot, elroy.
    Elroy, the length of each class is 45 minutes. The student will behave badly, for example in the middle of the class "at 20 minutes of the class". I will tell him/her leave the class(room). After my class, another class, for example, physics, will start. The student can attend that class on that same day because the class isn't mine. That means, the student will be expelled in the middle of the lesson in my class. The next day, he/she can attend my class after he/she promises to behave well in the future. I hope it will be clear to you.
     
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