Make the case, Make one's case

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Yul

Senior Member
Canada, French
"Let me express my thanks to the President Bill Clinton who made last night the case for change as only he can make it!" (Obama)

"The auto industry's formal plea for federal assistance commenced Tuesday, as executives from the Big Three auto makers and the president of the United Auto Workers Union made their case before the Senate Banking Committee for $25 billion in rescue funds." FOXBusiness

My question : Are they both idioms?

Thanks
Yul
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Well, it's really only one idiom and that's "make a case". It comes from the legal world regarding making a case in a courtroom. You "make your case" by convincing the judge or jury of the rightness of your position.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Trev: We've killed it on every challenge.

    His teammate: Yeah, we have. I know, seriously, you're so lucky.

    Trev: I don't know. I think I've earned my spot.

    Narrator: While Trev tries to make his case with the red team
    Source: Hell's Kitchen, 808

    Background: On a cooking competition show, there were two teams, Blue and Red, competing against each other. Trev, who was originally on Blue team, was sent to Red team to shake things up a bit. Since then, Red team had won every challenge and got a lot of rewards. Trev thought that it was his contribution that helped the team to victories, but his teammates disagreed, saying that their success had nothing to do with him.

    Does "tried to make his case" in this example mean "Trev tried to convince his teammates of the rightness of his position on the team"? Thanks
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    First: it should be: While Trev tries to make his case with to the red team

    Next: No, it means that Trev tried to convince his team that his argument (i.e. he was the cause of their success) was correct.
     

    redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thanks Paul Q. I have another question.
    Suppose a boss called in two under-performing employees and told them that only one of them could keep the job. Employee A said that he should stay because he was a passionate hard worker with untapped potential. Would you say Employee A is making his case to the boss. (Trying to convince his boss that he deserved the job)
     
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