make the jump without a net

如沐春风

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, everyone. Please do me a favour.

What does the phrase "make the jump without a net" mean in the following paragraph?


As the first signs of recovery begin to take hold, deputy chiefs may be more willing to make the jump without a net. In the third quarter, CEO turnover was down 23% from a year ago as nervous boards stuck with the leaders they had, according to Liberum Research. As the economy picks up, opportunities will abound for aspiring leaders. (make the jump without a net)

I would appreciate it if you could give me an explanation.
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Where is this from?

    The jump is part of a circus act on a high wire or trapeze and the net is a safety net, to catch them in case they fail to complete the jump successfully. They are both metaphors, of course, though without reading the article I cannot say whether each is a metaphor for a specific thing, or whether the expression as a whole is just a metaphor for taking a risk.
     

    如沐春风

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Where is this from?

    The jump is part of a circus act on a high wire or trapeze and the net is a safety net, to catch them in case they fail to complete the jump successfully. They are both metaphors, of course, though without reading the article I cannot say whether each is a metaphor for a specific thing, or whether the expression as a whole is just a metaphor for taking a risk.
    Thank you very much, Uncle Jack. It is from: (make the jump without a net)
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    The "jump" is rather a more mundane one (although it is still a metaphor), of jumping from one job to another. The "net" appears to be rather a misplaced metaphor; the word "net" clearly refers to a safety net, but it appears from the following paragraph that it isn't really a safety net that the people who jump lack, but a landing place, they don't necessarily have a job to jump into:
    Those who jumped without a job haven’t always landed in top positions quickly​
     

    如沐春风

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The "jump" is rather a more mundane one (although it is still a metaphor), of jumping from one job to another. The "net" appears to be rather a misplaced metaphor; the word "net" clearly refers to a safety net, but it appears from the following paragraph that it isn't really a safety net that the people who jump lack, but a landing place, they don't necessarily have a job to jump into:
    Those who jumped without a job haven’t always landed in top positions quickly​
    Thank you very much, Uncle jack. Your explanation is reasonable.
     
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