make up for the slanting, rusting, and aging of those great buildings

HolyUnicorn

Senior Member
Mandarin / the Shanghai Dialect
Hello:

“When we were looking for models for our house , we studied fifteenth-century Norman and Flemish farmhouses, and I wondered how in our new home we could make up for the slanting, rusting, and aging of those great buildings. ”

From "The Re-Enchantment of Everyday Life" by Thomas Moore

Context: the writer wants his new home to look like slanting, rusting and aging.

When “make up for” is used, something bad is “made up for”. But here it seems the slanting, rusting, and aging are the things that the writer want. How to understand “make up for” here?
 
  • Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You have rely on context. The way I read it is ...

    I wondered how in our new home we could make up for the slanting, rusting, and aging of those great buildings (not being present in the new one).”
     

    HolyUnicorn

    Senior Member
    Mandarin / the Shanghai Dialect
    Let me provide one more sentence.

    "When we were looking for models for our house , we studied fifteenth-century Norman and Flemish farmhouses, and I wondered how in our new home we could make up for the slanting, rusting, and aging of those great buildings. Our builder said that his way was to avoid using a measuring tape and square whenever possible, instead relying on the eye,which is never perfect but always human. ”

    You have rely on context. The way I read it is ...

    I wondered how in our new home we could make up for the slanting, rusting, and aging of those great buildings (not being present in the new one).”
    What do you mean by "not being present in the new one"? :confused:
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top