Mamlish

tissi

Senior Member
Spain, Spanish
Does anybody know the meaning of these word? I can't find it in the dictionary, but I think it exists. Maybe it is related to music, (jazz music?), but I don't know.
Thank you for your help.
tissi
 
  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    tissi said:
    Does anybody know the meaning of these word? I can't find it in the dictionary, but I think it exists. Maybe it is related to music, (jazz music?), but I don't know.
    Thank you for your help.
    tissi

    Tissi welcome to WR! :)

    I think it is a label... :arrow: Look at this

    Anyway wait for the English speakers, perhaps it has some meaning I don't know.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    I've also found this >>>
    The unidentified sleeve-note writer/s tentatively suggests an Alabama origin by the singer’s use of the word “mamlish”. Obviously making connections with Alabamian Ed Bell’s “Mamlish Blues”. But Bobby Grant who is acknowledged (if at all) as a Delta Blues man, also uses the word “mamlish” on his “Nappy Head Blue&’. (see Yazoo L-l00l). Don Kent reiterates the Joe Calicot quote but adds nothing else, in his notes to Yazoo L-1002,
    :arrow: source
     

    daviesri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    As Artrella said, it appears to be an old blues and jazz record label for african americans in the 20's and 30's. I have never heard the term myself and have no idea of what it means. I am guessing that it was some kind of slang word used by african americans at the time because it is used in various lyrics I found. Here are the lines that used the word, maybe you can get something from it.

    passenger :I caught the mamlish blinds Hey you can't Bell, Ed; Mean Conductor Blues; Chicago, c. Sept. 1927; (4820-1) Pm-12546 Yz L-1006
    turkey : coming through the mamlish corn I done told Grant, Bobby; Nappy Head Blues; Chicago, c. Dec. 1927; (20204-3) Pm-12595 Yz L-1001
    got no great long mamlish hair She ain't got Sluefoot Joe; Tootin' Out Blues; Long Island City, c. Apr. 1929; (490-A) QRS-R7086 His HLP-17
    nappy : your feet so mamlish long And you move Grant, Bobby; Nappy Head Blues; Chicago, c. Dec. 1927; (20204-3) Pm-12595 Yz L-1001
    Says I know my mamlish milkcow pretty mama : Lord Arnold, Kokomo; Milk Cow Blues; Chicago, 10 Sept. 1934; (C-9428-B) De-7026 BC-4
    just ought to see mamlish mine She's a long Sluefoot Joe; Tootin' Out Blues; Long Island City, c. Apr. 1929; (490-A) QRS-R7086 His HLP-17
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    egueule said:
    Hope he's mistaken his own ignorance for the whole world's.;)
    Well, he is speaking of me and my surroundings. Mamish?? This word would take some indepth research to find the significance, as others have already proven. Thank goodness for Google.

    I am a true Jazz and Blues fan. I have never heard this term before.
     

    mamlish

    New Member
    Norwegian
    Hi,

    Here's a guess: Mamlish seems to be a word with multiple uses from the examples I have read, but most them seem to point in the direction of something proper or special to a person. I'm guessing the word could be an adaptation of the French word "même" ("mismo" being the spanish equivalent), which is most often translated as "same", but also meaning "own", "special", "very" (as in "the very man who...") or something that stands out from the rest.

    Best,
     

    DovidM

    New Member
    English - United States
    As for Mamlish having been a record label of the 1920s and 30s, this is incorrect. It was a record label of the 1970s.
     

    Rainouart Mozarave

    New Member
    English - American
    The few sources I found on the internet that attempt to define "mamlish" call it an "intensifier".

    That's true enough, but the question is how does it intensify? it interjects a sensation of nostalgia, homesickness, heartbreak, loss, dejection, mortal sadness -- in a word, "the blues" -- into the story.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top