man-down play

Jhin

Member
Japanese, Chinese
Hi everyone,

I wonder what is the meaning of the sentence "standing on muddy sidelines listening to amped up parents relive man-down plays" ?
What is "man-down play"?
Does it mean a boring game or a game that is going to lose?

Thank you!
 
  • Jhin

    Member
    Japanese, Chinese
    Please tell us where you saw this sentence, and in what context.
    The entire sentence is:
    She just didn’t abide the scripture that said love meant shared hobbies, matching personalities and standing on muddy sidelines listening to amped up parents relive man-down plays while you wish you were home icing your lower back and having some vodka.
     

    Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    "man down" = a phrase to use in battle which means that a soldier in your group is lying on the ground.

    I would interpret 'man-down plays' as "murder mysteries."
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think it's referring to parents watching football (on muddy sidelines) and talking/complaining about one of the players being fouled. But I may be wrong. Without any context, I don't fully understand the complete sentence.

    Crossed with Franco-filly, who may well be right.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    We still don't know where this came from. Is it AE or BE? The meaning of a "play" is not quite the same in football played on American mud and football played on British mud.

    However, I'd expect "man-down" used as an adjective to mean that the team was short of a player, due either to injury or a sending-off.
     

    Jhin

    Member
    Japanese, Chinese
    I think it's referring to parents watching football (on muddy sidelines) and talking/complaining about one of the players being fouled. But I may be wrong. Without any context, I don't fully understand the complete sentence.

    Crossed with Franco-filly, who may well be right.
    Thanks for the explanation! I guess you are right.
    The sentence is from the book "Tell Me More".
    The auther was saying that her father is complete a sports-fan and would go to any games in that area, but her mother didnot like to watch boring games with her father. No detail about the games.

    "man down" = a phrase to use in battle which means that a soldier in your group is lying on the ground.

    I would interpret 'man-down plays' as "murder mysteries."
    Thanks! I guess phrase is used to describe something in a game.

    We still don't know where this came from. Is it AE or BE? The meaning of a "play" is not quite the same in football played on American mud and football played on British mud.

    However, I'd expect "man-down" used as an adjective to mean that the team was short of a player, due either to injury or a sending-off.
    American football I guess.
    It is from the book of "Tell Me More", describing days in 1950's in Philadelphia. The auther says her father would go to watch any games in that area but her mother was not very interested in some of the games.
    Also could be lacrosse but I guess lacrosse is not played in muddy grounds?
     

    fallingstv

    New Member
    English - Ireland
    Apparently in lacrosse, certain types of fouls mean that the offending player is sent off the pitch for a certain amount of time (like a yellow card in rugby if you follow that). When the offending team is in this situation they are missing a man so any plays they make would be "man-down plays". Conversely, the opposing team have an extra man so any plays they make would be "man-up" plays. You might have heard the term "power play" to describe the same situation in ice hockey.

    Not sure why you think lacrosse wouldn't be played in muddy grounds but I don't know much about lacrosse.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The only man-down situation in American football is when someone is lying on the field injured and play has been stopped to tend to them. Teams never play a man short. It's always eleven on a side. There are free substitutions.

    So the lacrosse possibility sounds plausible. It definitely would not have been soccer in 1950s Philadelphia.

    But I guess it's also possible, although it seems unlikely, that they were reliving memorable football plays where people got injured.
     
    Last edited:

    Jhin

    Member
    Japanese, Chinese
    Apparently in lacrosse, certain types of fouls mean that the offending player is sent off the pitch for a certain amount of time (like a yellow card in rugby if you follow that). When the offending team is in this situation they are missing a man so any plays they make would be "man-down plays". Conversely, the opposing team have an extra man so any plays they make would be "man-up" plays. You might have heard the term "power play" to describe the same situation in ice hockey.

    Not sure why you think lacrosse wouldn't be played in muddy grounds but I don't know much about lacrosse.
    Oh Thank you so much! Sorry but I know little about lacrosse. Will try to learn a bit more about it! Thanks again!
     

    Jhin

    Member
    Japanese, Chinese
    The only man-down situation in American football is when someone is lying on the field injured and play has been stopped to tend to them. Teams never play a man short. It's always eleven on a side. There are free substitutions.

    So the lacrosse possibility sounds plausible. It definitely would not have been soccer in 1950s Philadelphia.

    But I guess it's also possible, although it seems unlikely, that they were reliving memorable football plays where people got injured.
    Thanks! Thank you all for your explanation.
    I guess lacrosse (which I thought could not be the answer only because I'm a idiot lol) is right.
     
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