Man Utd striker has lost venom, his fangs are not as sharp

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supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello to all,
I was watching football the other day and after Rooney lost many opportunities to score a goal the commentator said something like this:
Oh, that Rooney has lost his venom.
And the guy next to him aknowledged by saying something like this:
Yeah,his fangs are not as sharp as they once were.

So, are these common idioms? Are they used exactly like that? Can it be used to imply that someone is not as powerful and influential as they used to be? :
"The Prime Minister is basically a spent force. He has lost venom and his fangs are not as sharp as they used to be."
Thank you in advance
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    are these common idioms?
    No - I've never heard them before.
    "The Prime Minister is basically a spent force. He has lost venom and his fangs are not as sharp as they used to be.
    As true as it might be, I would advise you to forget this metaphor completely. The football commentator's brain was not fully in gear.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    I've heard "lost his venom" to mean "not as forceful/effective/aggressive/ruthless" as before, and usually in sports contexts.

    The "fangs not as sharp as they once were" was just an acknowledgment in the same vein - not a commonly used idiom at all.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    But inventive! And for someone who has been deprived of his capacity to do something, ususally something harmful, we say "He's been defanged."
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    "He's lost his edge."? I'm not sure I'd call that a metaphor, though; an idiom, maybe. ("He's lost a step." refers specifically to speed or quickness.)
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Can it be used to refer to a politician that no longer is powerful?
    It means that someone isn't as effective or good as he once was, in a particular activity/field.

    If this politician is no longer powerful for that reason, and if that's what you want to emphasise, then yes, you could use it.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    It means that someone isn't as effective or good as he once was, in a particular activity/field.
    If this politician is no longer powerful for that reason, and if that's what you want to emphasise, then yes, you could use it.
    Or that someone has lost their motivation, intensity, passion.
     
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