Manaai - Bhojpuri/Awadhi/Hindi/Urdu?

ShadowKing

New Member
Hindustani & English
Greetings,

I am currently studying Caribbean Hindustani (specifically the Sarnami variant, as it appears to be the only surviving dialect and there are materials published and resources available in it).

Given that this is a language based on an arcane Awadhi and Bhojpuri dialect base that is quite divergent from the variant spoken in India today, and the fact that it has also been heavily influenced by two language that are unfamiliar to me, i.e., Dutch and Sranan Tongo, it is full of words that are new to me. By that I mean, as a native speaker of a newer Awadhi and Urdu, there are a plethora of words that I have never heard before, and I am curious as to whether these are older Indian words or if they are indeed loanwords.

One of these words is "manai" which appears to mean human/man/person and population (in the same context as I would use "abaadi").

Some examples of its usage:

Anglicized transcription:
“Parmeshwar ke qanoon ham-log-ke dekhaawe hai kee ham-log paapi log baati. Jab koi qanoon par chaley hai, baaqi ek huqum nah maaney hai, tab oo manai qanoon bhar torr dehwe hai.”

Dutch-based Sarnami orthography:
"Ek rodj ham boek me parhlie hai kie India me manai se djaada gaai hai. Manai 700 millioen aur gaai 900 millioen."

Many thanks,

A
 
  • desi4life

    Senior Member
    English
    Hi. Per R.L. Turner's dictionary, it's connected to the Sanskrit word maanava.

    10048 mānavá -- , f. °vīˊ -- ʻ human ʼ, m. ʻ man ʼ RV., māṇavá -- m. ʻ youth, little fellow ʼ Kāty., °vaka -- m. Gobh. [ -- -- early MIA. change or poss. infl. by ʻ defective ʼ word *māṇa<-> s.v. group *maṭṭa -- . -- mánu -- ]
    Pa. mānavikā -- f. ʻ young Brahman girl ʼ, māṇava -- , °vaka -- m. ʻ young man (esp. Brahman) ʼ, nāga -- māṇa<-> vaka -- m., °vikā -- f. ʻ young snake ʼ; Pk. māṇava -- m. ʻ man ʼ; Ku. māṇo, °ṇī ʻ man without beard or mustache ʼ (but see *māṇa -- s.v. *maṭṭa -- ); OB. māṇā ʻ man ʼ, (Maimansigh) mān ODBL 737, (Haijong) māna ODBL 347; Si. manvā, st. manav -- ʻ man, person ʼ; <-> < *mānavika -- : Bhoj. Aw.lakh. manaī ʻ man ʼ; H. manaī m. ʻ man, husband, bridegroom ʼ.
     
    Last edited:

    ShadowKing

    New Member
    Hindustani & English
    Hi. Per R.L. Turner's dictionary, it's connected to the Sanskrit word maanava.

    10048 mānavá -- , f. °vīˊ -- ʻ human ʼ, m. ʻ man ʼ RV., māṇavá -- m. ʻ youth, little fellow ʼ Kāty., °vaka -- m. Gobh. [ -- -- early MIA. change or poss. infl. by ʻ defective ʼ word *māṇa<-> s.v. group *maṭṭa -- . -- mánu -- ]
    Pa. mānavikā -- f. ʻ young Brahman girl ʼ, māṇava -- , °vaka -- m. ʻ young man (esp. Brahman) ʼ, nāga -- māṇa<-> vaka -- m., °vikā -- f. ʻ young snake ʼ; Pk. māṇava -- m. ʻ man ʼ; Ku. māṇo, °ṇī ʻ man without beard or mustache ʼ (but see *māṇa -- s.v. *maṭṭa -- ); OB. māṇā ʻ man ʼ, (Maimansigh) mān ODBL 737, (Haijong) māna ODBL 347; Si. manvā, st. manav -- ʻ man, person ʼ; <-> < *mānavika -- : Bhoj. Aw.lakh. manaī ʻ man ʼ; H. manaī m. ʻ man, husband, bridegroom ʼ.
    Thank you very much, or in Sarnami: aap ke bahut dhanbaad

    On the surface, it did appear to me that this word "manai" was indeed related to "manav"/"manush" etc. from Sanskrit, but since there is such a heavy influence of Dutch and Sraran Tongo on the language, I did not want to take a chance by guessing if this was a word with purely Indic origins.
     
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