Mangione

  • mimitabby

    Senior Member
    usa, english
    hog, pig, overeater

    to call a child a hog or a pig is pejorative, but it happens every day here.
    a more polite way to describe it would be as Daniela said
    "oh, he's a big eater"
     

    danalto

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    I knew it sounded too polite for a baby, thank you mimi, you reminded me of overeater...(not right for a baby too, I guess, but maybe better than my translation! ;) )
     

    DDT

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    mimitabby said:
    hog, pig, overeater

    to call a child a hog or a pig is pejorative, but it happens every day here.
    a more polite way to describe it would be as Daniela said
    "oh, he's a big eater"
    What about "glutton"?

    DDT
     

    mimitabby

    Senior Member
    usa, english
    DDT said:
    What about "glutton"?

    DDT
    i can't imagine a young mother describing to another
    that her child is a glutton. the more polite way really
    would be to say "my henry is a big eater"
    but she'd say to henry, "don't be such a pig"
    or if henry isn't sharing, you'd say, "you're hogging that"
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    mimi, when a baby or child likes eating very much, we define him/her as mangione or mangiona. It's a term of endearment and not offensive. It's not something you say directly to the child, rather you can tell a friend or relative. It also implies the baby/child eats everything.
     

    Jeannine

    Member
    France
    He is a greedy guts (pejorative)' big eater 'sounds better particularly for a child. You have 'gluttonous' too'
     

    mimitabby

    Senior Member
    usa, english
    Silvia said:
    mimi, when a baby or child likes eating very much, we define him/her as mangione or mangiona. It's a term of endearment and not offensive. It's not something you say directly to the child, rather you can tell a friend or relative. It also implies the baby/child eats everything.
    This is quite fascinating, it shows that starvation is closer in the collective
    memory of Italians than it is here.
    A child who is not picky, like my young sons were, would be called a good eater, which also describes a hearty appetite.
    But i wouldn't call it a term of endearment. We're way too nervous
    about overeating and obesity here.
     

    USAKris

    Member
    USA, English
    I prefer "piggy". It's like saying pig or glutton, but somehow cuter in my opinion. Perfect for babies!
     
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