mannaggia alla polenta

  • altita

    Senior Member
    English
    I'm sorry, there is not much text. A guy tells his friend to hurry up or they'll be late and the friend says:
    "Mannaggia alla polenta"!
    I don't have the slightest idea how to translate it.
     

    Fooler

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    You can find the word mannaggia in our dictionary with many threads related ;)

    Polenta too, but in your case here polenta is referred to the slowness his friend takes to hurry up, as the polenta, a tipical Italian dish, takes quite a lot to cook to obtain, stirring slowly, the perfection.

    So, I'd translate as Damn:warning: my slowness ! :D
     
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    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Nothing to do with the Italian dish or slowness, it's just an Italian way to say ":warning:Damn...!". You can find many expressions with "mannaggia", such as "mannaggia la pupazza /la marina / la miseria..." and so on
     

    Fooler

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Of course Mary (ciao), as many threads suggest, but I wanted to inspire myself to the slowness we cook polenta, relating the fact that the he doesn't hurry up because he is slow :D
     
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    Fooler

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    @Fooler A dice: "Hurry up or we'll be late! B risponde: Mannaggia la polenta! Perché dovrebbe dirlo se è lui ad essere lento? Non ha senso...

    Ok then....., I rephrase .....but in your case here polenta might have been expressed (my personal inspiration for the word polenta in this particual context :p) to the slowness he takes to hurry up, as the polenta, a tipical Italian dish, takes quite a lot to cook to obtain, stirring slowly, the perfection.

    So, Damn :warning: (my) slowness ! (I am late/so slow as if I was cooking the polenta) :p

    I hope to be clear now :(
     
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    polenta might have been expressed (my personal inspiration for the word polenta in this particual context :p) to the slowness he takes to hurry up, as the polenta, a tipical Italian dish, takes quite a lot to cook
    This is something you're making up
    You could change polenta a hundred different words and this expression would mean exactly the same thing.
     

    Fooler

    Senior Member
    Italian (Italy)
    Sorry Fooler, but I cannot agree. Slowness has nothing to do with this expression; there are a lot of "mannaggia" together with nouns / names, see my post #7. You can replace "la polenta" with many other terms (la miseria, li pescetti, la marina, or even worse...)
    It can be useful to read here: 6 sfumature di ‘mannaggia’ | Modi di dire napoletani

    Mary, you are right,I know that and I know what you quoted, as all threads here containing the word mannaggia. Ok, I give up

    This is something you're making up
    You could change polenta a hundred different words and this expression would mean exactly the same thing.

    Of course Paul, it is something I made up, in this particular context with the word polenta and containing hurry up (someone who is slow, is late/so slow as if was cooking the polenta) . I repeat: my PERSONAL interpretation/invention in THIS meaning. Does this make sense now ?

    Thank you
     
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    merse0

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Concordo con "mannaggia... quel che si vuole".

    Aggiungo però, a vantaggio dei non-italiani, che per definire una persona lenta, un posapiano si può definirlo "polentone".
    Espressione chiaramente derivata da "polenta".
     

    Pietruzzo

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Without more context we can't rule out the possibility that he's actually blaming polenta for some unknown reason. For example he could have noticed a spot of polenta on his trousers. Who knows?
     

    Sem86

    New Member
    Italian
    That’s just another way to avoid being vulgar. You say alla polenta/a li pescetti/ecc. instead of “al cazzo :warning:”. The other explanations are pure fantasy.
     

    ohbice

    Senior Member
    Mannaggia al cazzo :warning: mai sentito.
    Però è vero che tutti i termini associati a mannaggia sono tentativi di edulcorare un originale che non voglio scrivere perché non solo è volgare, è blasfemo.
     
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    esky

    Member
    English/Italian - bilingual
    It might be easier to simply consider the fact that "mannaggia"! basically means

    Darn! Damn it!

    So it's a very versatile expression that can change based on regionalisms and various dialects. It's true function is to act as faux curse words. There's a very entertaining English list here.
    And there's an interesting article in Italian here.

    My personal favourite is "Mannaggia alla paperella", but you can adapt it:

    "Mannaggia a 'sto forum"!

    Meow.
     
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