Mannaggia

Mya57

New Member
United States English
Hi,

First time ever using a thread. I am reading a book (in English) called Home to Italy by Peter Pezzelli. They use the word "mannagia". I cannot find a definition of this work. In the book a man is doing some work that his friend does not want him to do as he is a visitor in his house. The friend says "Mannagia"... my friend comes back to Italy and I should be putting him to work.........
 
  • Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Mya57 said:
    Hi,

    First time ever using a thread. I am reading a book (in English) called Home to Italy by Peter Pezzelli. They use the word "mannagia". I cannot find a definition of this work. In the book a man is doing some work that his friend does not want him to do as he is a visitor in his house. The friend says "Mannagia"... my friend comes back to Italy and I should be putting him to work.........

    it's a common Italian interjection that cannot be translated as it is;
    it's similar to your "damn" or "hell"...

    commonly used in the South of Italy, its meaning is 'male ne abbia'.
    it expresses wrath, rage and disappointments.

    hope it helps.
    and since it is your very first time.....
    WELCOME
     

    danalto

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Mya57 said:
    Hi,

    First time ever using a thread. I am reading a book (in English) called Home to Italy by Peter Pezzelli. They use the word "mannagia". I cannot find a definition of this work. In the book a man is doing some work that his friend does not want him to do as he is a visitor in his house. The friend says "Mannagia"... my friend comes back to Italy and I should be putting him to work.........
    Hi, Mya, and welcome here!
    First of all, it's mannaggia (double g).:)
    You could translate it with damn, blast, hang it...
    hope it helps!

    (DAMN! alfry got here one minute before me!):D
     

    walnut

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Hi Mya and welcome to the WR Forums! :)

    I shortened your thread's title to let other members rapidly identify the topic.

    Ciao! Walnut
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    danalto said:
    (DAMN! alfry got here one minute before me!):D
    that's it!!!
    in this case we'd say
    "mannaggia a lui, Alfry è arrivato un minuto prima di me"
    ....
    wait a minute... Alfry is me...:mad:
     

    Monkling

    Member
    NY
    US - English
    alfry said:
    in this case we'd say
    "mannaggia a lui, Alfry è arrivato un minuto prima di me"
    This just made my day - I understood the entire sentence! :) (That will be a rare occurrence.)
     

    BklynGiovanna

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hopefully, this is not taking this thread too far or in the wrong direction of "bad words", but I'm just curious... I always thought that mannaggia was worse than saying darn it. I believe you when you say it's not! However, if you add the word miseria to it at the end, does that make it much worse as a curse word. It sounds worse.
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    BklynGiovanna said:
    Hopefully, this is not taking this thread too far or in the wrong direction of "bad words", but I'm just curious... I always thought that mannaggia was worse than saying darn it. I believe you when you say it's not! However, if you add the word miseria to it at the end, does that make it much worse as a curse word. It sounds worse.

    you mean "mannaggia alla miseria", don't you?
    Maybe we are used to worse words but I can say that it is not that bad.

    what is odd to me is that "damn" is considered to be a bad word. I've been hearing and reading it too many times, I thought it wasn't that bad. :(
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    Alfry, it all depends on your perspective. I consider damn to be mild but it offends some people (probably due to being connected with "God damn).
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    DesertCat said:
    Alfry, it all depends on your perspective. I consider damn to be mild but it offends some people (probably due to being connected with "God damn).

    thank you DesertCat,
    I asked about that just to be sure I won't offend anyone. ;)
     

    mimitabby

    Senior Member
    US English
    BklynGiovanna said:
    Hopefully, this is not taking this thread too far or in the wrong direction of "bad words", but I'm just curious... I always thought that mannaggia was worse than saying darn it. I believe you when you say it's not! However, if you add the word miseria to it at the end, does that make it much worse as a curse word. It sounds worse.

    My sainted grandmother used to say "Mannaggia" so It's NOT a bad
    word.
     

    undern

    Senior Member
    Italy, Italian
    I was trying to transcribe the short film of David Lynch called "The cowboy and the Frenchman", and at some point the cowboy says an interjection, which has been translated in Italian as MANNAGGIA. The fact is that I cannot understand the English word for it. It's something like "gallies", "gallowses"... Does someone have an idea of what the exact word could be?

    PS: in Spanish this English word has been translated as "Anda!"
     

    Manuel_M

    Senior Member
    Maltese
    Alfry said:
    you mean "mannaggia alla miseria", don't you?
    Maybe we are used to worse words but I can say that it is not that bad.

    what is odd to me is that "damn" is considered to be a bad word. I've been hearing and reading it too many times, I thought it wasn't that bad. :(

    Is mannaggia LA (not alla) miseria said sometimes?
     

    pliny

    New Member
    usa english
    this word was used in many colorful expressions in the past. one i heard recounted was from an immigrant father to his children "mannaggia cristofero columbo" who discovered a country like this where children could speak to their parents like that."
     

    Biondo

    Member
    England - English
    I don't know how to spell it but the Neapolitan word if said in English would be:

    Manach

    Manachami

    I do understand the word and it's usage and i have my own ideas of what it could be in English but as there is no direct translation i would like a few more guesses as to what it could be!

    :)
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I think it is the interjection
    "Mannaggia" = damn or
    "mannaggia a me" = to hell with me


    It comes from male n'aggia = 'male ne abbia': source = Garzanti
     
    Thanks for the postings on Neapolitan dialect!

    We've been trying to figure out what the heck "managgia" (phoenetically spelled here) means. My Neapolitan uncle used to say (and phoenetically) "Managgia oh ree-owala fadenda." Ree-owala being diavolo. I always thought it meant "damn the dirty devil." But I can't find fadenda in the dictionary, or managgia, for that matter. Any insights? LOL
     

    pinturicchio07

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Thanks for the postings on Neapolitan dialect!

    We've been trying to figure out what the heck "managgia" (phoenetically spelled here) means. My Neapolitan uncle used to say (and phoenetically) "Managgia oh ree-owala fadenda." Ree-owala being diavolo. I always thought it meant "damn the dirty devil." But I can't find fadenda in the dictionary, or managgia, for that matter. Any insights? LOL

    Managgia is slang for :warn: damn.
     

    *Giulia*

    Senior Member
    Italiano / Italia
    Thanks for the postings on Neapolitan dialect!

    We've been trying to figure out what the heck "managgia" (phoenetically spelled here) means. My Neapolitan uncle used to say (and phoenetically) "Managgia oh ree-owala fadenda." Ree-owala being diavolo. I always thought it meant "damn the dirty devil." But I can't find fadenda in the dictionary, or managgia, for that matter. Any insights? LOL

    The right spelling is "MANNAGGIA". It means "damn!". I've never heard nothing like fadenda or ree-owala but I'm from Northern Italy, not from Napoli, so I speak a different dialect.

    EDIT: scusa Pinturicchio, mi hai battuta nel tempo!
     

    pinturicchio07

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    The right spelling is "MANNAGGIA". It means "damn!". I've nerver heard nothing like fadenda or ree-owala but I'm fron Northern Italy, not from Napoli, so I speak a different dialect.

    EDIT: scusa Pinturicchio, mi hai battuta nel tempo!
    Grazie per "Mannaggia" non "managgia"! ;)
     

    Henry63a

    Senior Member
    Italiano - Italia
    'Fadenda' could be 'fetente' that in a colourful way means 'dirty'.
    'Mannaggia al diavolo fetente' sounds very funny:)
     

    [ITA]Shank

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    The right spelling is "MANNAGGIA". It means "damn!". I've never heard nothing like fadenda or ree-owala but I'm from Northern Italy, not from Napoli, so I speak a different dialect.

    EDIT: scusa Pinturicchio, mi hai battuta sul tempo!

    Perdonami la correzione, probabilmente l'hai scritto con la mente ancora in modalità inglese. :D
     

    *Giulia*

    Senior Member
    Italiano / Italia
    [ITA]Shank;1421376 said:
    Perdonami la correzione, probabilmente l'hai scritto con la mente ancora in modalità inglese. :D

    Mmmm.. per questa volta ti perdono... :D

    Scusate gli errori ma sto già dormendo.

    "fadenda" = "fetente" sounds good!!
     
    From what I understand, fetente is frequently used as a noun, e.g.:

    quello lì è un fetente.

    In the sentence above "fetente" is a noun, because an adjective would not be preceded by the article "un."

    But I agree that in the specific example of this thread, we are looking at an adjective.




    It's an adjective, so that would be "stinking."
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    From what I understand, fetente is frequently used as a noun, e.g.:

    quello lì è un fetente.

    In the sentence above "fetente" is a noun, because an adjective would not be preceded by the article "un."

    But I agree that in the specific example of this thread, we are looking at an adjective.
    Yeah, I only meant in this thread in this context.
     

    Henry63a

    Senior Member
    Italiano - Italia
    In this case 'fetente' is an adjective (the noun is 'diavolo'), but we also use it as a noun as you correctly remark
     

    JoeyJack

    New Member
    English, USA
    My grandmother, and my mother have always used 1 phrase in Italian that they learned from my great grandmother when theyre frustrated or upset. I can't figure out what they are actually saying and I don't know the spelling. It sounds something like "menagia" and sometimes they also say "menagia l'america". With the emphasis on the "a". I'm curious as to what it means. The only translation that I could peice together was something to the effect of "Mena gia l'america", which I don't think would be correct. Can anyone venture a guess on this one?
     

    Giannaclaudia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    My grandmother, and my mother have always used 1 phrase in Italian that they learned from my great grandmother when theyre frustrated or upset. I can't figure out what they are actually saying and I don't know the spelling. It sounds something like "menagia" and sometimes they also say "menagia l'america". With the emphasis on the "a". I'm curious as to what it means. The only translation that I could peice together was something to the effect of "Mena gia l'america", which I don't think would be correct. Can anyone venture a guess on this one?


    From Garzanti linguistica:
    mannaggia
    Sillabazione/Fonetica [man-nàg-gia]
    Etimologia Voce merid.; da male n'aggia 'male ne abbia'
    Definizione inter. (fam.) imprecazione che esprime ira, irritazione, contrarietà: mannaggia a voi!; mannaggia la miseria! PEGG. mannaggiaccia
     

    myoho

    New Member
    Italian
    Hello I am new on this forum, I am not from the south, so I am not sure of the dialectal spelling, but I think the phrase is "Mannaggia o diavolo" which I believe would translate in Italian "Che mal venga al diavolo."
    Great meeting you all

    myoho
     

    elijah15

    New Member
    US English
    Hi, I'm new here also. I was wondering if anybody could help me out.. my grandfather used to say something in Italian all the time but never told us what it meant. I don't know the exact spelling but it sounded something like "Mannaggia la-vis-ta-la-zone" I know the first word is "damn" but the last part is probably a few words and I can't figure out what it could mean?
     

    Never Got a Dinner

    Senior Member
    America, English
    Comunque, abbiamo un genuino bisogno di una thread che dà tutte le possibilità di espressioni con mannaggia -- parola importantissimo, non lo neghiamo.

    Mannaggia la miseria!
    Mannaggia la morte!
    Mannaggia chi t'ha fatto! (che Nonno diceva a Papà, stranamente)
    Mannaggiaccia!
    Mannaggia il diavolo!
    Mannaggia l'America!
    Mannaggia Sant'Antonio!
    (e il mio preferito) Mannaggia la putana Eva!
     
    So che c'è già una thread di titolo Mannaggia. Comunque, abbiamo un genuino bisogno di una thread che dà tutte le possibilità di espressioni con mannaggia -- parola importantissimo, non lo neghiamo.

    Mannaggia la miseria!:tick:
    Mannaggia la morte!:tick:
    Mannaggia chi t'ha fatto! (che Nonno diceva a Papà, stranamente):tick:
    Mannaggiaccia!:cross: (never heard)
    Mannaggia il diavolo!
    Mannaggia l'America!:cross:
    Mannaggia Sant'Antonio!
    (e il mio preferito) Mannaggia la:warn: puttana Eva!

    Keep in mind I'm from North and we don't say mannaggia.
     

    IlPetaloCremisi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I'm from the North and I say mannaggia! Anyways I dont use all the expressions that NGAD wrote...sometimes I just say "Mannaggia" alone or I also say "Mannaggia a te/ a lui"...
    I'd say that mannaggia may be translated in general as "accidenti"...this translation fits almost all the expressions with mannaggia!
     

    Poianone

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy
    In my opinion, mannaggia, whose origins are in the southern dialects but that has been become common in the whole Italy, can be used to make up a plenty of expressions: it is "mannaggia" that is idomatic, not the restant part of the expression (except for mannaggia la morte and mannaggia la miseria - always in my opinion). So, you can say "mannaggia a something/someone" without losing the meaning of the expression, which is an expression of anger/frustration/astonishment directed towards something/someone.
     

    cscarfo

    Senior Member
    Italy Italian
    Mannaggia li pescetti!
    Mannaggia la pupazza!
    Mannaggia 'sto beccamorto
    These expressions are Roman.
    The etymology of "mannaggia" is simple: "mal ne abbia", by the way.

    Ciao
     

    gabrigabri

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy (Torino)
    Comunque, abbiamo un genuino bisogno di una thread che dà tutte le possibilità di espressioni con mannaggia -- parola importantissimo, non lo neghiamo.

    Mannaggia la miseria!:tick:
    Mannaggia la morte!
    Mannaggia chi t'ha fatto! (che Nonno diceva a Papà, stranamente)
    Mannaggiaccia!
    Mannaggia il diavolo!
    Mannaggia l'America!
    Mannaggia Sant'Antonio!:warn: :warn:
    (e il mio preferito) Mannaggia la putana Eva:warn: !

    Io non uso (e non userei) NESSUNA di queste espressioni!!
    Secondo me sono tutte molto forti!!
     

    roberta79

    Member
    Italy - italiano
    Credo che "Mannaggia la miseria" o "Mannaggia a te/lui etc." siano quelle che userei di piú..ma nessuna di queste mi sembra MOLTO forte, anzi rispetto a certe espressioni che si sentono al giorno d'oggi queste mi sembrano molto "soft"
     

    gabrigabri

    Senior Member
    Italian, Italy (Torino)
    Credo che "Mannaggia la miseria" o "Mannaggia a te/lui etc." sono quelle che userei di piú..ma nessuna di queste mi sembra MOLTO forte, anzi rispetto a certe espressioni che si sentono al giorno d'oggi queste mi sembrano molto "soft"


    Quelle due sì, soprattutto in senso ironico.
    Tu considera però che degli stranieri chiedono informazioni riguardo a questa parola, e io, personalmente, non mi sento di dire loro che "mannaggia Sant'Antonio" può essere usato tranquillamente! Ai miei occhi è una bestemmia.
    Mannaggia di per sé va bene, ma in quelle combinazioni secondo me no.
     

    roberta79

    Member
    Italy - italiano
    Sì, ecco, l'accostamento a santi ecc. non sta mai bene in nessuna imprecazione..su questo condivido pienamente, solo che a me non sembrano espressioni così forti..poi il fatto che io non le userei è un altro discorso..anzi sinceramente alcune non mi era mai nemmeno capitato di sentirle!
     
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