manner adjuncts in -wise/-fashion/-style.

Cristinita

New Member
Spain-Spanish
Hi!
Could you please provide me with some examples of adverbs of manner formed by a noun + suffixes -wise/-fashion/-style? I am not sure they exist.
Thanks in advance to everyone.
 
  • Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    Cristinita said:
    Hi!
    Could you please provide me with some examples of adverbs of manner formed by a noun + suffixes -wise/-fashion/-style? I am not sure they exist.
    Thanks in advance to everyone.
    I could only come up with -wise adverbs, so natives should give you the rest :).
    crosswise
    profitwise
    clockwise
    sidewise

    Hope this helps,
    Thomas
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Catwise - walking stealthily and silently through the long grass. Or alternatively, asleep in the softest, warmest place in the house.

    Something learnt by rote and stated without any understanding is repeated parrot-fashion.

    Eating family-style was meant to mean eating a meal around a table, all at the same time, and talking to one another. Clearly an obsolete concept.

    Election-style - I've forgotten that one ..... a yes, it was an election-style budget, meaning a pre-election budget designed to entice the voters.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I was wondering if "doggie fashion/style" could be used as an adverb (of manner)? :)
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Some popular -wise words: weatherwise, streetwise, careerwise, moneywise, health-wise, style-wise.

    -stye: period-style
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    I know I'm asking a dumb question, but I can't understand any of these words. I can't find them in my dictionary, either.
    Could you please explain them to me? Or could you give me the meaning of the suffix "-wise"?
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    coconutpalm said:
    I know I'm asking a dumb question, but I can't understand any of these words. I can't find them in my dictionary, either.
    Could you please explain them to me? Or could you give me the meaning of the suffix "-wise"?

    If you tack a suffix -wise to a word it usually gets the meaning "in the manner, direction", e.g. clockwise which means according to the direction of hands rotating in a clock; or they can get the meaning "with reference to, in regard to" e.g. taxwise -- with regard to the taxes.

    Hope this helps,
    Thomas
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    Thomas1 said:
    If you tack a suffix -wise to a word it usually gets the meaning "in the manner, direction", e.g. clockwise which means according to the direction of hands rotating in a clock; or they can get the meaning "with reference to, in regard to" e.g. taxwise -- with regard to the taxes.

    Hope this helps,
    Thomas
    Could you give me a couple of examples? I still can't understand:confused:
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I have edited some definitions into my post above #4.

    Wise is a very old word, and in this sense it has nothing to do with wise, the adjective. In fact, wise meant fashion or style.

    Ah.
    When used in this sense, fashion and style have nothing to do with catwalks and glossy magazines. My goodness what a lot of confusion is possible.

    Walking catwise is walking the way a cat walks. If I wrote that I had been washing my face cat-fashion, or cat-style, even though those expressions may never have been used before, they would be understood by most native speakers to mean washing my face as if I were a cat.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    You screw a bottle cap clockwise and unscrew it counterclockwise (at least in Poland). This means that if you want to screw a bottle cap you need to turn it from top to the right (like clock's hands) and all the way around if you want to unscrew it.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    coconutpalm said:
    Thank you, Panj!
    Does catwise have the same meaning as catlike?
    Not quite, but almost.
    Catlike could be appearance, or behaviour similar to a cat's. You could move with catlike grace, but not move catwise.

    Catwise is in the action, doing something or behaving in the manner of a cat.

    In other words, to do something catwise you need to have acquired something of the soul of a cat:cool:

    For most practical purposes they mean the same, but I live with two cats so I know the difference:p
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    Thank you, Thomas, Panj!
    It's clearer now. I made up some sentences. Could you check them for me?
    When he is angry, he acted weatherwise.
    He is a famous model. He walked across the T platform style-wise.
    How about "streetwise, careerwise, moneywise, health-wise"? They are most confusing!
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    -wise can mean "knowledgeable or experienced as regards X" as in streetwise or computerwise.
    -wise can also mean "in relation to" or "as far as X is concerned" as in careerwise and moneywise.

    Weatherwise means "as far as the weather is concerned" as in "It's looking pretty good out there weatherwise.
     

    coconutpalm

    Senior Member
    Chinese,China
    So some of these words are adjectives while others are adverbs?
    He is a streetwise/computerwise man.
    When you graduate from the college, make sure you make the right choice careerwise.
    I may be making a fuss about it, but I want to make sure that I can use them correctly.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    river said:
    -wise can mean "knowledgeable or experienced as regards X" as in streetwise or computerwise.
    -wise can also mean "in relation to" or "as far as X is concerned" as in careerwise and moneywise.

    Weatherwise means "as far as the weather is concerned" as in "It's looking pretty good out there weatherwise.
    Can -wise mean "knowledgeable (etc)" or "in relation to", when used to form an adverb?

    I couldn't think of such examples, hence my comment earlier, but now I'm beginning to wonder .......
     

    river

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Streetwise, computerwise, and weatherwise are adjectives. So I am streetwise (knowedgeable in the ways of the city) whereas you are computerwise (you are knowedgeable of computers).
     
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