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namlan

Banned
Vietnam
The employee: Sorry Sir, I'm late.
The boss: You're always late, you don't really have the industrial manners.

- Did I use the right clause here "You don't ..........industrial manners."?

Thanks a lot!

NamLan
 
  • Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    I'm not too sure what you're asking about here, NamLan.

    I've never heard the expression "industrial manners," and I suspect, taken out of this immediate context, it would baffle most people.

    That doesn't mean, however, that I don't like it! :D
     

    namlan

    Banned
    Vietnam
    - Dear Lexiphile and you guys!

    - I mean "the employee is always late for work, and that's why his boss is very angry and complains about his style of work", so how about this?

    "You really don't have the industrial style of work." :)

    Thanks a lot!

    NamLan
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    In the UK if people don't meet the norms of a workplace I think we tend to say "you're being unprofessional".
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    Yaaahhh, but Suzi, do we also say that for someone who works in a toothbrush factory, up to his elbows in grease, who shows up at his place in the production line so late that the first batch of brushes has to be sent out without the little holes drilled in them?
    NamLan was asking about an industrial employee. Would you accuse one of being unprofessional?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If the worker is a laborer and not a professional, then I would try:

    "Workplace decorum" or "workplace manners".


    This post is a natural product. The slight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way should be considered flaws or defects.
     
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