man's pursuit of entry into Heaven would be vague

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heather 1997

Senior Member
Cantonese-China
hi,everyone. i'm a new member here.
I discussed a problem with my classmate last night. She thought the sentence "Without Jesus' crucifixion, man's pursuit of entry into Heaven would still be vague." is correct, but i thought "Without Jesus' crucifixion, man would still pursue to enter into Heaven in vagueness." better.
Which version do you think is more idiomatic and what are the differences between the two versions?
thanks
 
  • cando

    Senior Member
    English - British
    In terms of sentence construction, the first sentence looks better. The second option feels very non-idiomatic. However, I’m not at all sure that “vague” is the right word. Vague means imprecise, ill-defined, non-committal, or hazy. Perhaps you mean “vain” which can mean pointless, not achieving the desired outcome. In which case your friend’s sentence could use “in vain” (not “in vaugueness”), a set phrase that would make the sentence idiomatic and its meaning perfectly clear.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Welcome to the forum, heather 1997!

    Can you tell us, using other words, what you want your sentence to mean? In particular, what do you mean by 'vague" or "vagueness?"

    [Cross-posted with cando]
     

    heather 1997

    Senior Member
    Cantonese-China
    Thank you for your replies.
    Here "vague" or "in vagueness" means "not practical, like a dream"
    .
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Thank you for your replies.
    Here "vague" or "in vagueness" means "not practical, like a dream"
    .
    "Vague" does not mean either of those things. By "like a dream," do you mean like something you would wish for strongly (winning a lot of money) or do you mean "unreal" like things that might only happen in a dream (seeing penguins in your house)?
     
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