.......... many business executives fear this country

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sb70012

Senior Member
Azerbaijani/Persian
.......... many business executives fear this country will lose its economic preeminence.
A. As poorly educated and trained as many young recruits to the United States work force are
B. So poorly educated and trained are many young recruits to the United States work force that
C. Because of many young recruits to the United States work force who are so poorly educated and trained
D. That many young recruits to the United States work force are so poorly educated and trained is why

Source: Iran University Entrance Examination for Master of Arts students.

Hello,
Option B is the answer key. But I thought C or D would be the answer key. This is really difficult.
Would you please be kind enough to tell me why C and D do not work here?

Thank you
 
  • rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    You’re right. It is difficult. Here are one or two suggestions. They're not supposed to be the last word on anything. It will be interesting to see what others have to say.
    C: would work with Because instead of Because of and force instead of force who.
    Because of tends to want something definite or complete after it - at least when you're talking about people. We’re in a mess because of him. It’s a stylistic thing. Here, you’re talking about many recruits and not all of them, so it’s not complete. The sentence would be more passable with …the many young

    D: That is a conjunction here. Is why is better after the pronoun that. That’s why I don’t like him. The sentence would work with is the reason why instead of is why.
    That is snowed all day was why we didn’t go out sounds clumsy. You’d be more likely to say something like We didn’t go out because it snowed all day or, if you want a that, It snowed all day and that was why we didn’t go out.
     
    Last edited:

    sb70012

    Senior Member
    Azerbaijani/Persian
    C: would work with Because instead of Because of and force instead of force who.
    Thank you for answering.
    I think we should omit "so" in option C too if we want it to work.
    Because it leads one to think "So poorly that what?"

    Am I right?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    C doesn't work because it singles out the recruits rather than the fact that they're poorly educated and trained.
    D is a very awkward version of the statement.
    B is the only grammatically correct answer.

    Sure, often in such tests other answers would work if they were modified in some way. But you're always asked to go with the exact choices that are presented to you.

    (Actually, it's nice to see a multiple-choice question where there is only one truly correct answer; many that are reported here have two or three possible answers.)
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Thank you for answering.
    I think we should omit "so" in option C too if we want it to work.
    Because it leads one to think "So poorly that what?"

    Am I right?
    You can leave the so in. It doesn't necessarily imply a that (The beer was so strong that I could only drink a pint). So can mean something like very: You've been so good to me. It can mean something like to that degree: He got an A in all his exams. I didn't realise he was so clever.
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, it would be, although it would change the meaning slightly. So poorly educated and trained emphasises the degree (i.e. a considerable one) of their lack of education and training. Poorly educated and trained on its own is more neutral in tone. It just says they haven't had much education and training.
     
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