Many friends gathered for a party <to say farewell to Akko>

wanabee

Senior Member
Japanese
Dear all,

Many friends gathered for a party to say farewell to Akko.

I made it up. Could you tell how you read this sentence?
1. Many friends gathered for a party <in order to say farewell to Akko.>
2. Many friends gathered for <a party that was to say farewell to Akko.>
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Confused?
    I think I need more explanation of the suggested difference between (1) and (2). Is it something to do with who organised the party?
    I'm tempted to say that if there is a difference, it really doesn't matter.
    The sentence structure looks familiar to me, and not at all ambiguous.
    Perhaps my nuance-detector has gone awry.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think a comma might help.

    Many friends gathered for a party, to say farewell to Akko
    - To say farewell to Akko, many friends gathered for a party.

    Many friends gathered for a party to say farewell to Akko
    - Many friends gathered for a party held to say farewell to Akko.

    The comma clarifies the first sentence, but I can't see how the ambiguity can be removed from the second, without adding that held, or something similar.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I might be beginning to see a difference.

    1. The party came into existence only because many of Akko's friends gathered to say farewell to him.

    2. A party had been arranged for the purpose of saying farewell to Akko; many of Akko's friends gathered at the party.
     
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