Many of them have done well in English and have made great progress in speaking it.

brian&me

Senior Member
Chinese - China
Since 1990s, English learning has been very popular with Chinese people. Many of them have done well in English and have made great progress in speaking it.

(Project English Wang Dechun)

I think ‘have done well in English’ includes listening, reading, writing and speaking and the ‘it’ is also unnecessary. So, maybe it’s better to rewrite the last sentence as follows:

Many of them have done well in English and especially have made great progress in speaking.

What do you say?

Thanks a lot in advance.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I would retain "it". For one it sounds incomplete without it and second, "progress in speaking" could also mean progress in public speaking, which may not necessarily be in English.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The 'it' is necessary here. Without it, 'speaking' simply means 'speaking'. "They have made progress in speaking." :confused: The 'it' is required to refer back to 'English'.

    I would omit 'especially' - it doesn't sound right here.

    (In the original sentence, it should say 'In the 1990s . . . ').


    Cross-posted.
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Thanks, everyone.
    Maybe I don't quite understand many of them have done well in English. Would you please paraphrase it for me?
    Thanks again.
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Yes, it includes speaking.
    So, it would be better to rewrite many of them have done well in English and have made great progress in speaking it as many of them have done well in English and especially have made great progress in speaking it?
    Thanks again.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I don't know about "better". You could use "especially" if you want to emphasise the speaking part and you could drop it if you don't want to emphasise it.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Many of them have made good progress in learning English.
    Thanks, Barque.
    Does that include speaking?
    Thanks again.
    No. Each student has made different amounts of progress in listening, reading, writing and speaking. It is reasonable to say some students have "made good progress in learning English" who have not become good at speaking English. That is probably why they add "and have made great progress in speaking it."

    The way this sentence uses "especially" is abnormal. It is not used this way. Students cannot "especially make great progress".
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Thanks very much, everyone.
    I think I've got it. 'Great' itself is stonger than 'well', so 'especially' is not necessary.
    What about the following?
    Many of them have done well in English and especially in speaking it.
    Thanks again.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Redundancy is not always a sin. I like your modified version: Many of them have done well in English and especially have made great progress in speaking it.

    The "especially" points out that of all the areas of need, the notably great progress has been in speaking.
     
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