many of <them><which>

li_mo

Member
italian
Hello to everyone!

Would you be so nice to tell me which of these two phrases sounds better to you ?

(1) A,B and C, have not been addressed yet, representing a key concern of Universities, many of them do not even have programs yet for supporting B.
(2) A,B and C, have not been addressed yet, representing a key concern of Universities, many of which do not even have programs yet for supporting B.

My best regards
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Many of which" is what you want, but it's not clear how "representing a key concern of universities" is attached to the beginning of the sentence.
     

    li_mo

    Member
    italian
    Thanks a lot @The Newt !

    I try to explain...

    A, B and C, have not been addressed yet. Therefore, A, B and C still represent a key concern of Universities, many of which do not even have programs yet for supporting B.

    Does it make clearer now?

    Note: Sorry, there was a small mistake at the beginning of my statement: "A, B and C, are have not been"... I just removed the "are".
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Thanks a lot @The Newt !

    I try to explain...

    A, B and C, have not been addressed yet. Therefore, A, B and C still represent a key concern of Universities, many of which do not even have programs yet for supporting B.

    Does it make more clear now?
    You'll have to say something like the following:

    A,B and C, have not been addressed yet, and are thus a key concern of Universities...
     

    li_mo

    Member
    italian
    Many many thanks! So, if I understood correctly, the entire correct statement should be like this:

    A,B and C, have not been addressed yet, and are thus a key concern of Universities, many of which do not even have programs yet for supporting B.

    Again, thanks a lot!
     
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