Mari está bañando a su hija

July9

New Member
Spanish (Spain)
Hola,

Tengo una duda. No sé cómo expresar en inglés "Mari está bañando a su hija".

¿Sería "Mari is having her daughter a bath"?

Se entiende que la hija no tiene la habilidad de "have a bath" y necesita ser realizado por Mari.

No creo que una voz pasiva sea adecuada en este contexto. Espero vuestra recomendación.

Muchas gracias de antemano
 
  • portuluismi

    Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Hola Juli9
    Se me ocurren dos posibilidades, visto que tu propuesta no es correcta.
    1. Usar simplemente el verbo "to bath", que puede ser transitivo: "Mari is bathing her daughter".
    2. Usar la locución "to give a bath": "Mari is giving her daughter a bath".
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Yes, in BrE I would bath the baby, not bathe.
    But 'give the baby a bath' would be my preference.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, in BrE I would bath the baby, not bathe.
    BrEn never ceases to astound me.

    bath
    vb
    Brit
    to wash in a bath

    Do you mean that "to bathe" is not used in the UK, or just that you prefer "to bath"? That latter one sounds really bad to my American ear.

    At any rate, in AmEn we usually do not use the verb, and instead use the noun as you do: Mari is giving her baby a bath.
     

    July9

    New Member
    Spanish (Spain)
    Hola Juli9
    Se me ocurren dos posibilidades, visto que tu propuesta no es correcta.
    1. Usar simplemente el verbo "to bath", que puede ser transitivo: "Mari is bathing her daughter".
    2. Usar la locución "to give a bath": "Mari is giving her daughter a bath".
    Haré eso, "to bath". No había caído, ¡gracias!
     

    OtroLencho

    Senior Member
    English - Western US
    ...or just that you prefer "to bath"? That latter one sounds really bad to my American ear.
    I agree; some Britishisms simply startle me, but this one actually sounds like an error (to another American ear). Perhaps because it's so similar to "bathe"...

    "Two peoples divided by a common language." :p
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    But you've known for a long time that BrEn is different, gengo, so why are you astounded when you discover another difference?
    I am astounded when something that I feel sure must be the same in both dialects turns out to be different, and especially when the British version sounds so horrible to me. I'm not putting BrEn down in any way; both dialects are equally valid and correct, of course. But you must allow me to be surprised when something like this comes along. My first wife was raised in Surrey and spoke BrEn, but I never heard her say this verb.
     
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