Mark (has) passed his driving test, which is fantastic

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ViB_Eng

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone,

I've seen this phrase "Mark passed his driving test, which is fantastic." which is in a source.

According to a rule of the present perfect tense here it has to use the sentence Mark has passed his driving test, which is fantastic. By my opinion it's wrong to use past tense because the relative clause has the verb TO BE "is" i.e. it shows a characteristic of present tense. Also it is happening at the moment. What do you think about that?

Please answer my question, what do you think about that?

Thank you
 
  • ViB_Eng

    Senior Member
    Russian
    What's the source?
    From Youtube
    Non-defining relative clauses | English grammar rules

    "He has passed his test. which is apparently influenced in its peace and conflict by the Light or Dark Side balance in this microcosm dimension. who are forced to ...", is that wrong? source: scribd
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    [...]

    "He has passed his test. which is apparently influenced in its peace and conflict by the Light or Dark Side balance in this microcosm dimension. who are forced to ...", is that wrong? source: scribd
    That quotation makes no sense.

    "Mark passed his driving test, which is fantastic." :tick:
    "Mark has passed his driving test, which is fantastic." :tick:

    There's no "rule" in English that makes either of the above incorrect.
     
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