Marks are one’s background at school while abilities (are one's background) at workplace.

flowersophy

Senior Member
Chinese-China
Hi,

A: Marks are one’s background at school while abilities (are one's background) at workplace.
B: Marks count at school while abilities (count) at workplace.
C: Marks are important at school while abilities (are important) at workplace.

Which sentence above makes sense? And I am not sure whether such an elliptical sentence is correct.

Many thanks!
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I'm not sure that they do make sense: at school, marks are indicative of ability. So you seem to be saying "Abilities are important at school while abilities are important at the workplace.

    You are perhaps trying to say that even if you did not perform well academically, you may, nevertheless, perform well in the workplace.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I think (C) probably comes closest to expressing the idea that whereas (good) marks are considered the important thing at school, (demonstration of) ability is the important thing in the workplace.

    But you can't use elision in sentences like those: it doesn't work. :(
     
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