marks the first year anniversary? marks the first year?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by hs3333, Aug 23, 2014.

  1. hs3333 Member

    Korean
    I am confused with this phrase. I want to say "It has been 50 years since we did blah". So, basically "2014 is the 50th anniversary since we did something".

    Among all the options below, which one sounds most natural? and which one is grammatically wrong?

    (A) 2014 is the 50th year anniversary that we did ~.
    (B) 2014 is the 50th anniversary of the year that we did ~.
    (C) 2014 is the 50th anniversary that we did ~.
    (B) 2014 is the 50th year that we did ~.


    Thanks for your help in advance :)
     
  2. Florentia52

    Florentia52 Modwoman in the attic

    Wisconsin
    English - United States
    You need to give us the complete sentence, hs3333, but I would say only (C) has a chance of being correct. The last one (the second "B") could be grammatically correct, but with a slightly different meaning.
     
  3. hs3333 Member

    Korean
    Thanks for your answer!

    The full sentence was "2014 is the 50th anniversary that our young soldiers stepped their foot on Vietnam".

    So you said (C) is likely to be correct and (D) has a different meaning. (Let's call it "D". Sorry for a typo)

    What is the difference between (C) and (D)? Also, does the word "anniversary" imply something neutral or positive? For example, if I am talking about something negative in a similar context, can I still use "anniversary"?
     
  4. sound shift

    sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    We talk about an anniversary of [+ noun phrase], so B seems satisfactory.
    "Anniversary that ..." sounds unidiomatic to me, so I couldn't use A, C or D.
    "2014 is the 50th year that we did ..." means that you have done this thing in 2014 and in 49 other years. It does not mean that it has been fifty years since you did this thing.
     
  5. panjandrum

    panjandrum Occasional Moderator

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    We normally have the 50th anniversary of an event, for example, the 50th anniversary of our wedding, our arrival in Honolulu, the battle of Donut Heights ...
    So if you want the anniversary to commemorate your soldiers setting foot in Vietnam, you might say something like:
    2014 is the 50th anniversary of our young soldiers' setting foot in Vietnam.
     
  6. hs3333 Member

    Korean
    Thanks for your answers, sound shift & panjandrum! :)

    Anniversary of + noun phrase. I was very confused with this one! Thanks for clearing that up.

    +) One question though... Can I simply say "2014 is the 50th year that our soldiers set foot in Vietnam." Should I use since instead of that in this sentence?
     
  7. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    You should use "since" in that construction. But I prefer panjandrum's "2014 is the 50th anniversary of our young soldiers' setting foot in Vietnam."

    Something else to consider is that we try not to start a sentence with a number ... 2014, in this case. If you'd like to follow that guideline, then you'll either need to write it out in words or rephrase the sentence; I usually rephrase.

    The year 2014 is the 50th anniversary of our young soldiers' setting foot in Vietnam.
    This year is the 50th anniversary of our young soldiers' setting foot in Vietnam.
    This year is the 50th anniversary of our young soldiers' setting foot in Vietnam in 1964.
     
  8. hs3333 Member

    Korean
    Thanks you so much! I will keep your number tip in my mind! Thanks :)
     

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