marvelous vs magnificent vs splendid vs glorious

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jason900401

New Member
Chinese
hi everyone, I am wondering if there is a difference among these words above?
For example, a excellent/splendid/marvelous/magnificent/impressive/glorious/ book.
Are there sutble differences?
Thank you. It's my first time to post a thread. Hope I understand the rules corretly.
 
  • imua

    New Member
    American English
    All of those adjectives are positive, and if you used any of those words to describe that book to me, I'd understand that you liked the book very much; there would be no doubt about that.

    Out of the words you've listed, I've probably described a book only as excellent. Aside from "impressive", I don't use the other adjectives too often because they sound either too formal or come off as hyperbole if I'm referring to regular objects or everyday events, especially in speech.

    A Brit might say a book (or something else) is splendid -- but again, it sound formal to my (American) ear.

    Something that's marvelous is something that causes great wonder (something to be marveled at); something magnificent or glorious is impressively or strikingly beautiful. Would you describe a book that way? Maybe... if it were an ancient, giant book covered in gold and jewels, perhaps.

    You could call a book impressive, but again, I think I would describe a book this way if it were exceptionally large, heavy, or of a quality that surpassed that of other books.
     

    imua

    New Member
    American English
    I should add that, to my ear:

    - an "excellent book" means that the written contents of the book are very good. (I really enjoyed the story; or, it was well-written; or, it was very entertaining and I couldn't put it down until I finished it!)

    - a "splendid book", while more formal (and arguably more British), is like saying "excellent book"

    - marvelous, magnificent, glorious, impressive: I would use these to describe the physical book itself -- the paper, the binding, its size, the material, the workmanship that went into making the object, etc.if the book were actually that special.
     

    xgll004

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Hello guys,

    I will use splendid/magnificent to describe the nature or a building. But I am not sure if I use these words correctly.
    I am wonderring how to use glorious since it seems to be a commond word in daily life.
     

    imua

    New Member
    American English
    You could use glorious to describe nature as well.

    The sunset this evening was splendid/magnificent/glorious.

    The Burj Dubai is the tallest building in the world, truly a splendid/magnificent/glorious feat of architecture and engineering.
     

    jason900401

    New Member
    Chinese
    I should add that, to my ear:

    - an "excellent book" means that the written contents of the book are very good. (I really enjoyed the story; or, it was well-written; or, it was very entertaining and I couldn't put it down until I finished it!)

    - a "splendid book", while more formal (and arguably more British), is like saying "excellent book"

    - marvelous, magnificent, glorious, impressive: I would use these to describe the physical book itself -- the paper, the binding, its size, the material, the workmanship that went into making the object, etc.if the book were actually that special.
    thank you, Imua. It helps a lot!Before your reply all these words sound like excellent to my ear.
     
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