Marwari/Rajasthani: kade aawo nii rasiilaa more des jowaaN tharii baaT ghane

marrish

Senior Member
اُردو Urdu
Hi,

There is a song sung by Mai Dhai & Atif Aslam "Kadi Aao Ni". The first line is this:

kade aawo nii rasiilaa more des jowaaN tharii baaT ghane

Mai Dhai SaaHibah is from Tharparkar in Sindh, Pakistan.

Which language is this? I suggested a broad name Rajasthani in the title but I would like to know which language it is.
 
  • tarkshya

    Senior Member
    Marwari
    This is definitely Marwari (Rajasthani). The sentence can easily pass as something spoken in any Marwar village.

    Translation: When are you coming to my country my beloved, I am pining for you.

    One caveat though. I would call the language Marwari instead of Rajasthani. Calling a single, distinct language as "the" Rajasthani language makes only as much as sense as "the" Indian language.
     
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    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    Hi tarkshya, if it isn't too much to ask, could you, please, give a bit more detail? Like, is it being said to a man or a woman (and how do we know that), or maybe it does not indicate any such thing? And what exactly do the last four words mean literally? Is it like "I am looking at your path/way"?
     
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    tarkshya

    Senior Member
    Marwari
    Like, is it being said to a man or a woman (and how do we know that), ..

    The object of the song is called rasiilaa which is a masculine word (same as in most Indian languages). Therefore the song is being addressed by a woman to a man.

    ..or maybe it does not indicate any such thing?

    Well, if it were, say, Pashto poetry, I wouldn't be so sure that the subject and object of a love poem necessarily belong to opposite genders ;). But with Marwari poetry, you can take it for granted.

    And what exactly do the last four words mean literally? Is it like "I am looking at your path/way"?

    Literal translation:
    kade aawo nii - when are you coming. (kade = when)
    rasiilaa - my dear/beloved etc.
    more des - my country
    tharii - your
    jowaaN baaT - I am waiting (same as Hindi baaT johna)
    ghane -
    a lot. ghaNRii (घणी ) is more common form.
     
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    tarkshya

    Senior Member
    Marwari
    On a side note, can any Sindhi member of this forum translate the same line in Sindhi? I will be very interested in knowing how far Sindhi diverges from Marwari.
     

    littlepond

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Dib jii, "jowaan baaT" here directly maps to the Hindi "intezaar/raah dekhnaa" (jo - see, regard, watch; baaT is rougly "waiting of English and precisely "raah" (in the sense 'raah dekhnaa') of Hindi). I think I have heard "ghaNRii" (a lot) in Hindi too, esp. when Rajasthanis use Hindi.

    Meanwhile, thanks, tarkshya jii, for your detailed and informative answer!
     

    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    Thanks a lot tarkshya and littlepond for your kind answers, and in the process, I even learned the new Hindi expression - "baaT johnaa". I could cobble together the meaning, because I am familiar with the words "baaT", "jo-" (to see), and "ghaNR-" (a lot) but from other languages like Gujarati and (very literary) Bengali. So, I had to get it verified. :)

    This reminds me, "baaTo" is the usual word for "road, path" in Garhwali, if my memory is not deceiving me.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    Thank you for the answers and discussion. tarshya jii, I said in the OP that I just chose a broad geographical term, otherwise I don't think a title like "Unknown language" would not be suitable... or writing "Hindi:" or "Urdu:" etc. etc.

    After these verses, Atif Aslam sings the following words: jaanaa hae moro jaanaa hae moro jaanaa piyaa ke des, nah roknaa mohe nah Toknaa, maarii jaan chalii piyaa ke des

    Is this also Marwari? My gut feeling is that it's a different language but I don't exclude the Marwari possibility. In the song there are also Urdu and Punjabi parts of text, so it's a great mix of different languages.
     

    mundiya

    Senior Member
    Hindi, English, Punjabi
    After these verses, Atif Aslam sings the following words: jaanaa hae moro jaanaa hae moro jaanaa piyaa ke des, nah roknaa mohe nah Toknaa, maarii jaan chalii piyaa ke des

    Is this also Marwari? My gut feeling is that it's a different language but I don't exclude the Marwari possibility. In the song there are also Urdu and Punjabi parts of text, so it's a great mix of different languages.

    It is grammatically Khari Boli, but the words you underlined belong to several Hindi dialects (e.g. Bundeli, Braj Bhasha, etc.).
     

    Dib

    Senior Member
    Bengali (India)
    I agree with mundiya. This does not look Marwari. For one thing, I believe the Marwari possessive markers are r- based (like ro, rii) rather than k-based (like piyaa ke des), which does point to a more Easterly origin to this section.

    Also, in the title thread, shouldn't it be "mhaare des", rather than "more"? That's what Mai Dhai Sahiba seems to be singing, and that's also a Rajasthani (Marwari?) form I am familiar with from the song and Rajasthan tourism slogan - "padhaaro mhaare des".
     

    tarkshya

    Senior Member
    Marwari
    Also, in the title thread, shouldn't it be "mhaare des", rather than "more"? That's what Mai Dhai Sahiba seems to be singing, and that's also a Rajasthani (Marwari?) form I am familiar with from the song and Rajasthan tourism slogan - "padhaaro mhaare des".

    Yes, the word is "mhaare", and that is what she is singing. "more" (or rather "mhore") is plural form of mhaare. So mhaare = mine, mhore = ours.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    I agree, it is mhaare, I mistyped it in the title. But sometimes I hear it "mhore" indeed.
     

    marrish

    Senior Member
    اُردو Urdu
    You can watch a BBC interview 13/11/15 with Mai Dhai here. The interviewer uses Urdu while Mai Dhai SaaHibah speaks another language. Which language is this? It is also partially translated in Urdu in the subtitles.
     

    tarkshya

    Senior Member
    Marwari
    You can watch a BBC interview 13/11/15 with Mai Dhai here. The interviewer uses Urdu while Mai Dhai SaaHibah speaks another language. Which language is this? It is also partially translated in Urdu in the subtitles.

    The language is Marwari. The dialect is bit difficult for me to follow, but with careful listening I can understand it completely. It is obviously a dialect spoken in the western side of the desert.

    Somewhere in the middle of the interview she mentions that Marwar is her "nanane" (Nana's place). So she obviously has a mother tongue sort of affinity with Marwari.
     
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