masculine/feminine restroom

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Angelya

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,all! The other day I found one restroom in a company marked by masculine and another feminine. Is this idiomatic to distinguish restrooms? Looking forward to your early reply!
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    If an online language forum had offices, I'd expect the restrooms to be marked masculine and feminine.


    Would a lady need to be dressed appropriately, I wonder (painted nails, high heels, full makeup?) :D
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I found one restroom in a company marked by masculine and another feminine.
    There is a tendency for businesses to use a variety of pairs words, icons and other designs as designators for the male and female toilets/bathrooms. These pair often reflect the ethos or theme of the business. Otherwise there is no significance in them.

    Some take things to extremes - this one is from a dog club:
    dogs1.jpg
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'd be interested to know which company and which country. I think it's extraordinary, but I don't get out much these days. I hardly know what it means.
     

    Angelya

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I'd be interested to know which company and which country. I think it's extraordinary, but I don't get out much these days. I hardly know what it means.
    It's a famous translation company in China.
    At the first sight of this kind of expression, I thought it very strange though I got its meaning.

    Thanks for your replies!
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's a famous translation company in China.
    This is vital context. So it is a joke. Many European languages distinguish grammatically between masculine and feminine in a way that is fundamental to the grammar, but in a way that relates only in a loose and complex way to the difference between male and female; and in some places the signs on toilet doors are a big political issue.
     
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    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    The words masculine and feminine refer to style, not sex, so obviously, a masculine lavatory is painted in blue with black stripes, and a feminine one is pink with flowers.

    If they mean men and women, or ladies and gentlemen, they should say so.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I see "unisex" bathrooms in the USA.

    From WR dictionary:

    See -uni-, -sect-.
    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    u•ni•sex (yo̅o̅nə seks′),adj.
    1. designed, or suitable for both sexes;
      not distinguishing between male and female;
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    The words masculine and feminine refer to style, not sex, so obviously, a masculine lavatory is painted in blue with black stripes, and a feminine one is pink with flowers.

    If they mean men and women, or ladies and gentlemen, they should say so.
    In the US I daresay masculine lavatories would be dark green with tartan accents and a few decals of ducks rising from marshes, while feminine lavatories would be, as you say, pink, with line drawings of unnaturally slender 1950's fashion models in high heels, dresses, and chic hats walking a poodle or two. Preferably with the Eiffel Tower in the background.
    How such a couple could get together, when one is promenading on the streets of Paris and the other is lying in a duck blind, is beyond me.
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    If they mean men and women, or ladies and gentlemen, they should say so.
    :thumbsup:
    ...as they do down under, you mean?
    Down to earth and not leaving a doubt in the mind of anybody in need of a quick relief: Bruces vs Sheilas. :eek::D

    I looked like this, the very first time I was confronted with it: :confused:
    But well, you do figure it out in the end - one way or the other. :)
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
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    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    :D
    Interesting take on the definition of PC. (that's a response to the initial picture)

    Actually, these little oddities in different countries is what makes travelling abroad quite fun!
     
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