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Casquilho

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hi fellows,
I don't have any knowledge of Japanese language, but I'm in a special need now, so I'm claiming for your gentle help.
How do I say "master" in Japanese? I mean, master in the sense a valet could call his lord, in the sense an athlete could call his instructor/teacher, in the sense Christian Slater calls Sean Connery in that film, The Name of the Rose. You know, I'm searching for something more elastic than sensei, which, I think, is only for teachers - of course I may be wrong.

Also, does the order affect Japanese syntax in this case? If I'm adressing my master, shall I call him, [master] [his name]-san, or vice-versa?

(Please, give me the translation in Hiragana, or even better, in Romanji; I can't read kanji at all!)
 
  • Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    master in the sense a valet could call his lord, in the sense an athlete could call his instructor/teacher, in the sense Christian Slater calls Sean Connery in that film, The Name of the Rose
    Unfortunately, Japanese does not have a single word to cover all of them. These cases are different relationships and these relationships are expressed by different words.
     

    uchi.m

    Banned
    Brazil, Portuguese
    I mean, master in the sense a valet could call his lord
    shujin
    in the sense an athlete could call his instructor/teacher
    sensei
    in the sense Christian Slater calls Sean Connery in that film, The Name of the Rose.
    sensei again
    You know, I'm searching for something more elastic than sensei, which, I think, is only for teachers - of course I may be wrong.
    sensei means master in the sense of a person who instructs/conducts you in some sort of art or craft (dō) or wisdom (gaku)
    Also, does the order affect Japanese syntax in this case? If I'm adressing my master, shall I call him, [master] [his name]-san, or vice-versa?
    just use the honorific term: (Casquilho-)shujin, (Casquilho-)sensei, given that Casquilho is your family name
     
    Last edited:

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Shujin is a neutral word meaning a master, thus inappropriate to be used by a valet for his mater. Why a neutral word is not good? Simply, a valet is in the relationship that the word describes. He must show respect to his ingroup superior by using a ingroup word. By the way shujin cannot be used as a suffix.

    What word must we use then? It depends on who the lord is. Is he a petty samurai? or is he a real lord with 5000 or more of samurais under him? Is he a shōgun? If the lord is from a different culture, then the wisest thing is to follow the convention of translated literature.
     

    uchi.m

    Banned
    Brazil, Portuguese
    Shujin is a neutral word meaning a master, thus inappropriate to be used by a valet for his mater. Why a neutral word is not good? Simply, a valet is in the relationship that the word describes. He must show respect to his ingroup superior by using a ingroup word. By the way shujin cannot be used as a suffix.
    I thought shujin could work because the lord-valet relationship has to do with the pertaining of land to the lord and the dependency of the valet to this piece of land, and thus, to the lord himself.
     

    almostfreebird

    Senior Member
    Born and raised in Japón, soy japonés
    I thought shujin could work because the lord-valet relationship has to do with the pertaining of land to the lord and the dependency of the valet to this piece of land, and thus, to the lord himself.
    If it is a samurai movie, だんな(dan-na) or だんな様(dan-na-sama) or ご主人様(go-shujin-sama) could be used.
     

    q_006

    Senior Member
    US and English
    This may not be elastic, but I've heard "shisho" used, when one refers to his/her master.
     
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