Master's degree..

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Wie sagt man?:

I am working on my master's degree? I typed master in the dictionary but it didn't show anything pertaining to degree.

My attempt: Ich arbeite fur meine ___________???

Danke
 
  • berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    This depends on if you are talking about the English degree or the equivalent German one. The German equivialents are called
    Master
    Magister
    Diplom
    depending on university and faculty. It is a very recent phenomenon that German universities award a degree called Master. Seemingly everthing is considered better these days, if it has an English name; even though the English degree master is just a translation of the traditional degree magister.:mad:
     

    çamegonfle

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    A master's degree in the US in not the same like a master's degree in the EU.

    From what I know a master's degree in the EU is more like a bachelor's degree in the US. It lasts 5 years (well 3 yrs bachelor + 2 yrs master) and you write a master thesis in the last semester.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    From what I know a master's degree in the EU is more like a bachelor's degree in the US. It lasts 5 years (well 3 yrs bachelor + 2 yrs master) and you write a master thesis in the last semester.
    A German Magister or Diplom corresponds to the Anglo-Saxon master. My degree of Diplom-Volkswirt, e.g., is recognized in the UK as an M.Sc. Until recently, the German system knew no equivalent to the bachelor. The equivalent of the master was the lowest university degree in Germany. What you have in mind is probably the French licence which is indeed closer to the Anglo-Saxon bachelor.
     

    çamegonfle

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Bernd,

    I know what you mean. Actually I just wanted to highlight that a bachelor's degree and a master's degree are not the same in the US and in the EU (including the UK).

    One of my friends studied 5 years for a bachelor's degree in the US.. and could hardly get an equivalence in Germany to start her PhD as people don't know about it, even the universities..

    You mean that a master's degree (4 years in the UK) was an equivalent to a Vordiplom?! and my maîtrise (4 years in France) is an equivalent to a Diplom.. luckily I..

    Do you know if a master's degree is still 4 years in the UK? or if they had to lengthen it to 5 years to "harmonise" with the "Bologna Prozess"?
     
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    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    One of my friends studied 5 years for a bachelor's degree in the US.. and could hardly get an equivalence in Germany to start her PhD as people don't know about it, even the universities.
    This is because the bachelor was until recently not recognized as a degree at all. The equivalent of the master was the lowest degree. One of the reasons they are changing the system is to make it easier to get move between the systems.
    You mean that a master's degree (4 years in the UK) was an equivalent to a Vordiplom?!
    No, not to a Vordiplom but to a Diplom!!! A Vordiplom is not a degree, it is an intermediary examination.
     
    Last edited:

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    See also the Wiki page on the (new!) Master degree in Germany, Switzerland and Austria - this is quite complicated and even not easy to answer for a single country (in Austria a Master = M. may be a degree of one of the FH's = 'high school university of applied sciences' [or sth. like that] as well as an university degree).

    In Austria traditional degrees were:
    - Diplomstudium (title: Mag. = Magister): takes at least 4 years but open end (you may take 10 or 15 years to finish it if you like, or if you can't finish quicker for whatever reason)
    - Doktoratsstudium (title: Dr. = Doktor): takes a further 2 years at least (again, open end) and you have to finish your Mag. first (except for medicine students)
    - and as a further extension Habiilitation

    A Master = M. degree either is below "old" Mag. level or equal to it. (It will probably take decades before the introduction of this new level really will improve comparability of degrees within EU ... for the time being it only has increased chaos, unfortunately.)
     
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    cyanista

    законодательница мод
    NRW
    Belarusian/Russian
    ...(in Austria a Master = M. may be a degree of one of the FH's = 'high school :cross:for applied sciences' [or sth. like that] as well as an university degree).
    Vorsicht, sokol!

    I am sure you know there is a huge difference between Hochschule and high school, the former being a tertiary educational institution and the latter a part of the secondary education system.

    German Fachhochschulen call themselves "university of applied sciences" in English.
     

    sokol

    Senior Member
    Austrian (as opposed to Australian)
    I am sure you know there is a huge difference between Hochschule and high school, the former being a tertiary educational institution and the latter a part of the secondary education system.
    Yes, I am aware that there's a difference, thanks for mentioning! My formulation was sloppy (I used a literal translation) and could be misinterpreted, therefore I've edited my post. ;)
     
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