Mastery/master vs dominaiton/dominate

A-friend

Senior Member
Persian (Farsi)
Hello everyone

As many of us know, domination simply means "power or control over other people or things" and mastery means "complete control of something". Also, if someone has a mastery of something, they are "extremely skilled at it."
Also, based on dictionaries;
Master means:
to learn to control an emotion or feeling.
and
Dominate means:
to have control over a place or person.
As you see, despite the fact that there is a considerable overlap between these two words, unfortunately I couldn't find any reliable and reasonable online resource to list them as a part of my research. I have made some examples which logically, each one of them can take both of the two words, but I wonder if you could let me know which word fits better and sounds more natural and idiomatic within each case and why?
Examples:

> 1. He never gets angry easily and is a quite reasonable and rational person. He ................. his feelings.

a. has mastery of
b. has domination on
c. masters
d. dominates

> 2. Barcelona started the match very well and steamrolled its opponent. Barcelona ............... the game from the beginning.

a. had mastery of
b. had domination on
c. mastered
d. dominated

> 3. Whoever wants to make any decision, he must approve it first. Everybody including his wife or his children respects him a lot and asks him for advice if it comes to any problem. Actually, he ............... his wife / children!

a. has mastery of
b. has domination on
c. masters
d. dominates
 
  • heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Only 'dominated' would work in #2, and 'dominates' in #3.

    None of the options suit #1. I would say 'He controls his emotions', or 'He keeps his emotions in check.'

    Note 'has domination on' doesn't sound right. It would probably be 'has domination over', but I can't think of a sentence right now in which it might be used.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Have mastery of something = become fully skilled at it
    Have mastery over something (or someone) = have gained control over it (or them, in the sense of having the ‘upper hand’)

    We don’t normally talk of people “having” domination over anything.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Only 'dominated' would work in #2, and 'dominates' in #3.

    None of the options suit #1. I would say 'He controls his emotions', or 'He keeps his emotions in check.'

    Note 'has domination on' doesn't sound right. It would probably be 'has domination over', but I can't think of a sentence right now in which it might be used.
    Thank you heypresto, but can we say: "he has control on his emotions/feelings"?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Control doesn’t take “on”.

    EDIT: Having said that, I’ve just googled it, and it does seem to be quite widely used in the English spoken in some countries/areas. I still maintain it’s not normal in the BE English I speak.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Control doesn’t take “on”.

    EDIT: Having said that, I’ve just googled it, and it does seem to be quite widely used in the English spoken in some countries/areas. I still maintain it’s not normal in the BE English I speak.
    Thank you lingobingo, but would you mind if I ask about some more examples here in order to make sure about them? 😊
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Of course you can do whatever you like. I have no control on over it. :D
    I’m just giving my perspective. There’s a thread on the same thing here: Have control OVER / ON something

    By the way, domination on doesn’t work either, on my planet. :)
    You're great lingobingo. 😄
    So I have privided some other examples here.
    I would be really appreciative if you could let me know about them too. 😊
    --------
    1. He is an expert in (his job / English) and has quite good experience in this field and I believe that he ................... (his job / English).
    a. has mastery of
    b. masters
    c. dominates

    2. This is a large land and there is only one person who is well familiar with this area and knows every single spot here. She ................. this area.
    a. has mastery of
    b. masters
    c. dominates

    3. The meeting was really breathtaking for all of us excepting David. He is a very intelligent man and as a person who knows what and how to say anything, he ............... the situation/meeting.
    a. had mastery of
    b. mastered
    c. dominated
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    1. None of those expressions are natural in the context of someone’s job. Domination is also not appropriate with regard to a skill. Mastery is (albeit in a rather different sense), but only in an idiomatic statement, such as:
    His mastery of English is impressive. :tick:

    2. They’re all wrong.

    3. Only dominated would sound natural, but it would not mean what you want it to.
    David dominated the meeting = David was a pain in the backside and didn’t let anyone else get a word in edgeways!
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    1. None of those expressions are natural in the context of someone’s job. Domination is also not appropriate with regard to a skill. Mastery is (albeit in a rather different sense), but only in an idiomatic statement, such as:
    His mastery of English is impressive. :tick:

    2. They’re all wrong.

    3. Only dominated would sound natural, but it would not mean what you want it to.
    David dominated the meeting = David was a pain in the backside and didn’t let anyone else get a word in edgeways!
    Uh, lingobingo maybe I've been wrong in choosing the coorect words for the meaning in my question. I guess you have already realized the meaning in my question. I would appreciate if you could let me know, what word would you use for each case of mine if you were me?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I wouldn’t say them that way at all. I’d use informal/idiomatic expressions, such as:

    1. He’s on top of his job.
    2. She knows the area like the back of her hand.
    3. He was the star of the meeting.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    1. He’s on top of his job.
    Regarding his job, I was not going to conpare him with anybody else and bring up something about his position! I was going to talk about his capability and ability degree comparing to himself and say something to show how much he is skillful and the degree of his proficiency in his job.
    -------
    2. She knows the area like the back of her hand.
    The same goes here! I don't want to say something about the way he knows the area. I was going to say something about the level of his familiarity with the area!
    -------
    3. He was the star of the meeting.[/FONT]
    And finally, here I don't need to compare him with someone else! Instead, I wanted to say how skillfully he could manage the meating. (He is comparing to himself rather than someone else!)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    My versions 1 and 2 are not comparisons. They mean exactly what you want them to.

    And to me, 3 seems OK to imply that too, but you could be more precise and say, for example, “He’s a very accomplished public speaker”.

    The long and the short of it is, we don’t use dominate and master in the ways you seem to think.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    My versions 1 and 2 are not comparisons. They mean exactly what you want them to.

    And to me, 3 seems OK to imply that too, but you could be more precise and say, for example, “He’s a very accomplished public speaker”.

    The long and the short of it is, we don’t use dominate and master in the ways you seem to think.
    That's interesting, but we have one single common term for all my provided examples in Farsi! Perhaps, English lacks such a word.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    I wouldn’t say them that way at all. I’d use informal/idiomatic expressions, such as:

    1. He’s on top of his job.
    2. She knows the area like the back of her hand.
    3. He was the star of the meeting.
    I have thought a lot lingobingo and in order to complete this question I would be really appreciative if you do me a favor and answer the following question.

    Can we say:
    1- He is proficient in English.
    2- He has proficiency in English.
    3- He is proficient in his job.
    4- He has proficiency in his job.

    Numbers #1 and #3 sound natural and idiomatic to me, but I have no idea if #2 and #4 work properly.

    I wonder which sentence does not sound natural to a native.
     
    Last edited:

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Only 1 sounds natural to me, since we normally use proficiency to imply the adequate standard that someone has reached in a specific skill. For example, in the UK you can take a cycling proficiency test, and non-native English-speakers can study for the Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE).

    However, I see that Lexico gives the example “I was proficient at my job”.

    We don’t say that someone “has” proficiency.
     
    Note to A-friend, with one detail not covered by lingo's excellent posts.

    2. This is a large land and there is only one person who is well familiar with this area and knows every single spot here. She ................. this area.
    a. has mastery of
    b. masters
    c. dominates
    ===


    As has been pointed out, 'dominates' is not generally used for have skills, but here is an example I made.

    Serena Williams, champion tennis player, has dominated women's tennis for decades. Yesterday was no exception forWilliams: against the hapless Ms X, utter domination on the court. :tick:
     
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