may as well

mink-shin

Senior Member
Korean - Korea, Republic of
I made a virtual situation which was similar with mine. Let me introduce it to you.

There're Irisa, Ben, Ross and their boss in a company. They're set a task by their boss. Because Ben was Irisa's ex, she doesn't like to do a task with him. But he is so good at doing the task, while Ross isn't. She has to give a nice impression to boss, because it's her first day of her company. Irisa has to do the task with either Ross or Ben. At that moment, Irisa asks me for an advice.
I want her to do the task with Ben rather than with Ross. Because they've been over since 3 years ago. Is it okay with this situation for me to tell her, "You may as well do with Ben as with Ross"?

Sometimes I have had trouble in my language, even though I had not in(*edited by me)tended to use it impolitely. I've wondered if it is okay, since I messaged real woman who I embodied in Irisa. So would you mind teaching me? Thanks in advance.

p.s) Is there a contraction of 'May as well'? My puckish young cousin told me that I could use 'may's well' or 'may 'swell' as well. But I couldn't find any information about it, and he would make fun of me who isn't native. So I cannot believe the his word.
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    "You may as well do something with A as with B" means you think it makes absolutely no difference. Since Irisha doesn't feel comfortable doing the task with Ben, she would be right to choose to do it with Ross - you have told her that there's no difference.

    "You may as well" is written in full, unless you are transcribing slurred speech.
     

    mink-shin

    Senior Member
    Korean - Korea, Republic of
    "You may as well do something with A as with B" means you think it makes absolutely no difference. Since Irisha doesn't feel comfortable doing the task with Ben, she would be right to choose to do it with Ross - you have told her that there's no difference.

    "You may as well" is written in full, unless you are transcribing slurred speech.
    Thank you, velisarius.

    Maybe, from now on, I have to use Eng-Eng dictionary rather than Eng-Kr dictionary.

    Thank you, again.
     
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