May have arrived yesterday/have arrived yesterday

help Me911

Member
Turkish
Saying "He may have arrived yesterday" is correct,but i know that using spesific time with present perfect tense isn't correct.
 
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  • se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Modal verbs do not distinguish between past tense and present perfect. These examples show how they are conjugated in their epistemic senses; it is different when they are used in conditional and deontic contexts.
    He is arriving now ==> I am not sure but he may/might be arriving now.
    He arrived yesterday ==> I am not sure but he may/might have arrived yesterday.
    He has already arrived ==> I am not sure but he may/might have arrived already.
     

    help Me911

    Member
    Turkish
    Modal verbs do not distinguish between past tense and present perfect. These examples show how they are conjugated in their epistemic senses; it is different when they are used in conditional and deontic contexts.
    He is arriving now ==> I am not sure but he may/might be arriving now.
    He arrived yesterday ==> I am not sure but he may/might have arrived yesterday.
    He has already arrived ==> I am not sure but he may/might have arrived already.
    Can i use "he may be sleeping yesterday" or i must use " he may have been sleeping yesterday ". İ think that perfect continuous denotes a time period.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    He was sleeping yesterday ==> I am not sure, but he may/might have been sleeping yesterday. :tick:
    Can i use "he may be sleeping yesterday" or i must use " he may have been sleeping yesterday ".
    I don't know what you mean; but I cannot immediately think of a context in which "He may be sleeping yesterday" is right.
    I think that perfect continuous denotes a time period.
    The present perfect continuous indicates an action that happened over a past period that continued to the present period. It is therefore not commonly used with "yesterday".

    "May have been sleeping" can have the sense of the past tense or the present perfect tense. As grassy said in #2, and as I implied in #5, the combination "[modal] have been [verb]ing" is not a marker of the present perfect tense.
     
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