may / might

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Green_soul

New Member
México, Spanish
:tick: Hello ev'ry 1

I can't find what the difference is.

When should I use one or another? :confused:

If you could help me, thanks in advance! :)

If any mistakes, correct'em, please! :thumbsup:

Cya!!! :D
 
  • sperdomo

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Hola

    May and might can be used for prediction, permission, advice, or logical probability.

    Permission
    Only may is commonly used in American English to ask permission.

    :tick: May I go to the store?
    :tick: May I sit down?
    :tick: Can I sit down? -----much less formal
    :cross: Might I sit down? ---This can be found in books, but is rare in conversation, at least in my dialect of American English.

    Prediction
    It will rain --- strongest prediction
    It may rain --- less sure
    It might/could rain. ---slightly less sure (although native speakers will probably argue about which is weaker, may, might, or could)

    Possibility
    Someone's knocking at the door..
    It must be Mary ---strong possibility
    It should be Mary-- less strong
    It may be Mary --less strong
    It might/could be Mary --weakest

    Advice
    Might can be used to give polite advice but not may
    You must revise this ---strong and demanding
    You should revise this ---less strong
    You might revise this ---very weak advice
    :( You may marry him -- doesn't imply advice...gives permission

    To make things more complicated, there are some shifts in meaning in the negative and not all of these forms can be made into questions, for example, :cross: Might you revise this? or :cross: May it be Mary? Both are awkward. Let me know if you want all of those rules too. I assume you don't! Good luck!
    Susan
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hi Green Soul'

    Might is an auxiliary verb and the past tense of May....

    may1 (m
    )
    aux.v. Past tense might (m
    t)
    1. To be allowed or permitted to: May I take a swim? Yes, you may.
    2. Used to indicate a certain measure of likelihood or possibility: It may rain this afternoon.
    3. Used to express a desire or fervent wish: Long may he live!
    4. Used to express contingency, purpose, or result in clauses introduced by that or so that: expressing ideas so that the average person may understand.
    5. To be obliged; must. Used in statutes, deeds, and other legal documents. See Usage Note at can1.
    might2 (m
    t)
    aux.v. Past tense of may

      1. <LI type=a>Used to indicate a condition or state contrary to fact: She might help if she knew the truth.
      2. Used to indicate a possibility or probability that is weaker than may: We might discover a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.
    1. Used to express possibility or probability or permission in the past: She told him yesterday he might not go on the trip.
    2. Used to express a higher degree of deference or politeness than may, ought, or should: Might I express my opinion?
    te gato;)
     

    Green_soul

    New Member
    México, Spanish
    Hi Susan (sperdomo)
    Thanks a lot for your reply!!! It is very clear and complete.

    I'd like to know the question rules as well.
    Take care!!! :)
     

    charmedboi82

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    sperdomo said:
    Hola

    May and might can be used for prediction, permission, advice, or logical probability.

    Permission
    Only may is commonly used in American English to ask permission.

    :tick: May I go to the store?
    :tick: May I sit down?
    :tick: Can I sit down? -----much less formal
    :cross: Might I sit down? ---This can be found in books, but is rare in conversation, at least in my dialect of American English.

    Prediction
    It will rain --- strongest prediction
    It may rain --- less sure
    It might/could rain. ---slightly less sure (although native speakers will probably argue about which is weaker, may, might, or could)

    Possibility
    Someone's knocking at the door..
    It must be Mary ---strong possibility
    It should be Mary-- less strong
    It may be Mary --less strong
    It might/could be Mary --weakest

    Advice
    Might can be used to give polite advice but not may
    You must revise this ---strong and demanding
    You should revise this ---less strong
    You might revise this ---very weak advice
    :( You may marry him -- doesn't imply advice...gives permission

    To make things more complicated, there are some shifts in meaning in the negative and not all of these forms can be made into questions, for example, :cross: Might you revise this? or :cross: May it be Mary? Both are awkward. Let me know if you want all of those rules too. I assume you don't! Good luck!
    Susan
    I agree with most of this, but I think you can use 'might' to ask for permission. Granted, I do realize many people do not use it in that way, but I've heard and also use it from time to time.

    As far as may/might with respect to which one gives a stronger idea of probability, I would say it depends on the region and each individual speaker. It also depends on the tone of voice.

    Keep up the great work!
     

    y0li

    New Member
    Spanish , Spain.
    Hi everyone!!
    i´m new and my english isn´t good , but i think i can help.
    • May , in spanish means "puede".
    Ex :This may be possible-> esto puede ser posible
    • Might , means "podría" very similar than could.
    Ex:-This might be possible-> esto podría ser posible.

    As they had said may is more possible than might.

    I hope this can help you.

    yol.
     
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