may typically <resulted> <result> <be resulted> from

JustMe750

Member
Hebrew - Israel
Hello,

Which of the following is correct?

(1) These symptoms may typically resulted from consumption of meat products.
(2) These symptoms may typically result from consumption of meat products.
(3) These symptoms may typically be resulted from consumption of meat products.

Thank you :)
 
  • JustMe750

    Member
    Hebrew - Israel
    Only 2) is correct.
    Would you kindly explain to me why?
    Isn't the verb "result" here should be used in a passive tense?

    it's my understanding that such sentences may be phrased in either an active voice or a passive voice.

    In this case,
    Active voice: Consumption of meat products may typically result in these symptoms.
    Passive voice: These symptoms may typically resulted from consumption of meat products.

    So... where am I wrong?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The passive version (in the sense of "may typically be the result of") would be "may typically have resulted from".

    Of course this isn't really passive.
     
    Last edited:

    JustMe750

    Member
    Hebrew - Israel
    "may typically have resulted from".
    I see, but isn't have resulted a past tense?
    It sounds to me as if the speaker describes a specific case that happened in the past, in which a patient ate meat, developed the symptoms, and now the speaker is trying to analyse the case postfactum, making an assumption that those symptoms have resulted from the meat meal (rather than from some other cause); however, I am not willing to talk about the "meat-symptoms" connection with regard to a specific case, but rather in a general manner, like you pharased it: The symptoms may typically be the result of meat consumption".

    I'd appreciate your input.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I see, but isn't have resulted a past tense?
    Yes, because "resulted" in this case is a past participle. If you don't want any sense of the past here, then you can't use "resulted".

    The problem is that the verb "result" does not have a passive form. Perhaps it has in your language, but not in English. The verb can change direction in terms of whether its subject is the cause or the outcome, but that disctinction is made by choice of preposition.

    A cause results in an outcome, or an outcome results from a cause. There is no grammatical way that an outcome can "be resulted".
     
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