mazejte chrapat

Sugy

New Member
Greek
What exactly does it mean this sentence that a friend send me ? “ mazejte chrapat hahaha”
Is not possible to translate it from a translator . Please help ! Thank you
 
  • Mori.cze

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Hi, unfortunatelly as written it does not mean anything. My guess is that there is a typo and "cheapat" should be "chrápat", in case I am right it would mean "go to bed" (you in plural) or more literally something like "dart to snore". It is very very informal.
     

    Sugy

    New Member
    Greek
    Hi, unfortunatelly as written it does not mean anything. My guess is that there is a typo and "cheapat" should be "chrápat", in case I am right it would mean "go to bed" (you in plural) or more literally something like "dart to snore". It is very very informal.
    Thank you so much . In the moment he send me this message “ mazejte chrapat” , I was speaking with one girl. Does now make any more sense ? Thank you again
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    In Standard Czech, "chrápat" means to snore, but in informal slang it means to sleep.
    Also the imperative "mazej" (sing.) or "mazejte" (plur.) is very informal in this context.

    In informal slang, "mazej/mazejte chrápat" means simply "go to bed".

    In Standard Czech, it is:

    Jdi spát! (to one person)
    Jděte spát! (to more persons, or to one person formally)
     

    Sugy

    New Member
    Greek
    In Standard Czech, "chrápat" means to snore, but in informal slang it means to sleep.
    Also the imperative "mazej" (sing.) or "mazejte" (plur.) is very informal in this context.

    In informal slang, "mazej/mazejte chrápat" means simply "go to bed".

    In Standard Czech, it is:

    Jdi spát! (to one person)
    Jděte spát! (to more persons, or to one person formally)
    Thank you bibax
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    The key sense of "mazat" in collocation with an infinitive like this, as noted by Mori.cze by the word "dart", is usually to do the action quickly in the sense of "don't ask questions", "no ifs, no buts", "just get on and do what I'm telling you!"

    Without the exact context (maybe it was evening or night time when the comment was made?), I'd suggest "Isn't it past your bedtime?" It's not a question in Czech, of course, it's an imperative, but that's probably how we'd phrase it socio-idiomatically in English here. The commenter adds ha ha ha!, of course, to "lighten" the comment in case the reader feels offended.

    As noted by the previous posters, the style is informal, slang, but pretty normal for chatspeak.
     
    Last edited:

    Sugy

    New Member
    Greek
    The key sense of "mazat" in collocation with an infinitive like this, as noted by Mori.cze by the word "dart", is usually to do the action quickly in the sense of "don't ask questions", "no ifs, no buts", "just get on and do what I'm telling you!"

    Without the exact context (maybe it was evening or night time when the comment was made?), I'd suggest "Isn't it past your bedtime?" It's not a question in Czech, of course, it's an imperative, but that's probably how we'd phrase it socio-idiomatically in English here. The commenter adds ha ha ha!, of course, to "lighten" the comment in case the reader feels offended.

    As noted by the previous posters, the style is informal, slang, but pretty normal for chatspeak.
    Yes it was very late in the evening . Thank you so much enquiring mind
     
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