Me encargaron perder un gato

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Doggert

New Member
English
I have translated "Me encargaron perder un gato" as They commissioned me to lose a cat. Or They put me in charge of losing a cat. Is there some kind of expression in Spanish for "perder un gato" beside the obvious translation of losing or getting rid of a cat?
 
  • Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Hello Doggert amd welcome.
    Please tell us where you have read or heard this phrase, and as Mr.Dent has said, explain the situation.
     

    Doggert

    New Member
    English
    The protagonist in the novel is a trucker, and he has been asked by a shady administrator to pick up a girl, take her to a city and then let some men spirit her away. He was also told not to follow her. So, I am thinking "get rid of" rather than "lose" a cat, because "lose a cat" does not sound as native to me. I was even thinking about translating the phrase as, "make a cat disappear." The girl is the cat because later on the protagonist writes that he is having dinner with her and he refers to her as the "gata a perder."
    Thank you for your responses and your help.
     

    Doggert

    New Member
    English
    Yes, I would changing the Spanish quite a bit with "make the cat disappear". I have decided to write, "take away" which fits the context: "They put me in charge of taking away a cat." In this way I can now write "gata a perder" as the "take-away cat." Thank you gvergara.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Thanks, everyone. I'm good for now. I appreciate your weighing in.
    I'm glad you are satisfied, but you should provide a few lines of the Spanish text for context. Native speakers in this thread have said that it sounds odd, so it's on you to provide sufficient context so they (we) can understand what the original means. That will get you much better replies, now and in the future.
     

    Amapolas

    Senior Member
    Castellano rioplatense
    Yes, please, a bit of context, where you found the expression, etc.
    Also, you first wrote gato and later on gata. That might make a difference. For example, in Argentina, the term gato can mean a woman who's an expensive prostitute, one who goes out with powerful or wealthy men. And it's used like that, in the masculine form even though it applies to a woman: la mina esa es un gato.
    So, some clarification wouldn't be amiss.
     

    Rocko!

    Senior Member
    Español - México
    Aparentemente, el autor del libro es Uriel Quesada, de nacionalidad costarricense, por lo que tal vez en Costa Rica entiendan la expresión.

    En mi zona "desaparecer/deshacerse de un gato" se diría "hacer perdedizo un gato", pero no es el caso ni el autor es mexicano.

    Saludos.
     

    Doggert

    New Member
    English
    ¡Así es, Rocko! Estoy en contacto con el autor, pero quería saber qué opinaban Uds. ¡Muchas gracias!
     
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