Me ha perdonado la multa

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jaimehm

Senior Member
Spanish
Hola,

Hoy iba usando muy móvil en la bici de camino a ver a un amigo y de repente, un coche de policía se ha parado al lado del carril bici y me ha dicho que si sabía que no está permitido usar el teléfono en la bicicleta.
Al final, me he inventado una excusa creíble y me ha perdonado la multa/ me ha dejado irme.

Mi amigo es británico,me ha entendido pero quizá hay mejores opciones. Se lo he explicado así:

I was cycling on my way here and a police car pulled in next to the bike lane I was going on and the officer said to me that he saw me using my phone while on my bike and reminded me that it's not allowed to do so. I made up an excuse and he swallowed it and let me off the hook.

Can below suggestions also applicable in this situation?

He got me off the hook
let me go unpunished
I got away with it
he let it slide


Gracias!
 
  • Ferrol

    Senior Member
    Spanish.España
    Me parecen bien todas
    También
    He let me go scot-free
    He waived the fine
    He looked the other way
     
    Last edited:

    jaimehm

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Gracias!

    Se que podría haber utilizado, he didn't give me a fine/ticket in the end e incluso en voz pasiva. Pero me complico demasiado jeje.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    I was cycling on my way here and a police car pulled in next to the bike lane I was going on and the officer said to me that he saw me using my phone while on my bike and reminded me that it's not allowed to do so. I made up an excuse and he swallowed it and let me off the hook. :tick:

    Can below suggestions also applicable in this situation?

    he got me off the hook :cross:
    he let me go unpunished
    I got away with it
    he let it slide
    The other three are fine, but the first one has a different meaning. The most common expression is what Fenix has suggested.
     

    aldonzalorenzo

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    ...he let me off with a warning.
    ...he let me go with a warning.
    The most common expression is what Fenix has suggested.
    Do you always say 'with a warning'? Does it mean the police officer said something specifically or is it just if he stops you?

    What if he stopped you as a routine (you didn't do anything wrong, but he has to stop one in a hundred cars) and you have driven perfectly well and he has no way to see any fault in you?
     
    Last edited:

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    In that case, there would be nothing for him to "let you off", so the expression would not be applicable.
    Not true, because the cop isn’t going to tell you he only stopped you because he felt like it. He’ll make you think he’s letting you off easy even if he never intended to ticket you.
    Do you always say 'with a warning'? Does it mean the police officer said something specifically or is it just if he stops you?
    In many places in the US, the “warning” is not merely verbal: it’s often a written document that the cop gives you. warning traffic ticket - Google Search

    More detail can be found in this article: Warning (traffic stop) - Wikipedia
     

    aldonzalorenzo

    Senior Member
    Castellano
    Not true, because the cop isn’t going to tell you he only stopped you because he felt like it. He’ll make you think he’s letting you off easy even if he never intended to ticket you.
    Well, these days of Coronavirus, the Police stopped you just to ask where you were going... Happened to me twice: they stopped me, asked me and let me go.
    Would I say that they let me off?

    In many places in the US, the “warning” is not merely verbal: it’s often a written document that the cop gives you.
    The thing is that I was surprised that you "wrote ...he let me off with a warning /...he let me go with a warning."
    And gengo said it was the most common expression.
    So, I guess you always have a warning when they stop you.
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    Well, these days of Coronavirus, the Police stopped you just to ask where you were going... Happened to me twice: they stopped me, asked me and let me go.
    Would I say that they let me off?

    The thing is that I was surprised that you "wrote ...he let me off with a warning /...he let me go with a warning."
    And gengo said it was the most common expression.
    So, I guess you always have a warning when they stop you.
    We wouldn't use fenix's phrase in the situation you describe. "...with a warning" is used when you have committed some infraction (speeding, not stopping completely at a stop sign, etc.), but the officer decides not to issue a citation. It's usually because the driver has some kind of excuse. Many cops are actually decent human beings, and try to be sympathetic.
     

    joseluisblanco

    Senior Member
    Español, Argentina
    To learn a language is to learn about its culture.
    Lo que quiero decir es que no logro imaginar a un policía en Buenos Aires deteniendo a un ciclista por hablar con el móvil mientras circula. ¡Mucho menos que exista un formulario para llenar!
    Por eso creo que me falta muchísimo para entender el inglés.
     

    Masood

    Senior Member
    British English
    The OP is in England. I do a lot of cycling here, and as far as I'm aware it's not illegal to use a mobile phone while cycling, but you could be committing another offence - 'cycling without due care and consideration'. So, it looks like the copper just had a quiet word. It's a fair cop, so to speak.
     
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