Me hubiera-hubiese/habría gustado...

weird

Senior Member
SPAIN
Hola, le quiero decir a mi amiga que me habría gustado/me hubiera/hubiese gustado darle el regalo el pasado viernes.

What about your birthday? Did you go to have dinner with Mike to celebrate it?

I have got a present for you!!! I would have liked to give you it on Friday. Ohh, What a pity!!

Tengo que usar HAVE o HAD.

¿existe otra forma de decirlo?

Gracias por vuestra ayuda.- :)
 
  • Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    weird said:
    Hola, le quiero decir a mi amiga que me habría gustado/me hubiera/hubiese gustado darle el regalo el pasado viernes.

    What about your birthday? Did you go to have dinner with Mike to celebrate it?

    I have got a present for you!!! I would have liked to give you it on Friday. Ohh, What a pity!!

    Tengo que usar HAVE o HAD.

    ¿existe otra forma de decirlo?

    Gracias por vuestra ayuda.- :)

    Hi Weird!

    I would have liked to give it to you last Friday. :p Tenés que usar "have" porque es la forma de construir el pasado de "would like"

    I don't know if there is another way to say that.

    maybe... I wish I had given it to you last Friday (Ojalá te lo hubiera dado el viernes pasado)

    ;) :) :p Saluditos!!
     

    soupdragon78

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hola Wierd.

    "I have got a present for you!!! I would have liked to give you it on Friday. Ohh, What a pity!!"

    Esto es perferfecto. No necesita ningún cambio. Ojala que te ayudo.

    Soup.

    P.S. "...given it to you last Friday..." está bien también.
     

    el alabamiano

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    weird said:
    Hola, le quiero decir a mi amiga que me habría gustado/me hubiera/hubiese gustado darle el regalo el pasado viernes.

    What about your birthday? Did you go to have dinner with Mike to celebrate it? I have got a present for you!!! I would have liked to give you it on Friday. Ohh, What a pity!!
    Since this is informal, I would say/write this as:

    What about your birthday? Did you go to dinner with Mike to celebrate? By the way, I have a present for you. I wanted to give it to you on Friday, but...too bad! :)
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    el alabamiano said:
    Since this is informal, I would say/write this as:

    What about your birthday? Did you go to dinner with Mike to celebrate? By the way, I have a present for you. I wanted to give it to you on Friday, but...too bad! :)
    Neal is correct...there are other ways to say it, but what Weird wrote was perfect!

    I wish I had given it to you Friday, I really wanted to.

    cuchu
     

    Edher

    Senior Member
    USA
    Cd. de México, Spanish & English
    Saludos,

    So is Neal saying that

    "I wanted to give it to you on Friday..."

    is more formal than,

    "I would have liked to give it to you on Friday" ?

    Edher
     

    el alabamiano

    Senior Member
    English (US)
    Edher said:
    Saludos,

    So is Neal saying that

    "I wanted to give it to you on Friday..."

    is more formal than,

    "I would have liked to give it to you on Friday" ?

    Edher
    No, the way I wrote it is informal. Of course, the other way isn't all that formal, and will do almost anytime. I'll also add that "formal" is: I should have liked...
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    If you start with "I would have liked" then you probably ought to stick with the past tense: "I would have liked to have given it to you". But the suggestions given to you by the others sound far better and less formal (i.e. stuffy).
     

    charmedboi82

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "I would (have) liked to have given it to you.."

    Does any native English speaker omit the 'have' in parentheses at times when speaking?
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    charmedboi82 said:
    "I would (have) liked to have given it to you.."

    Does any native English speaker omit the 'have' in parentheses at times when speaking?


    I am not a native Eng-Sp but when we pronounce it quickly the "ve" of "would've" is almost imperceptible.
     

    charmedboi82

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    You're very right about that, but I didn't mean that.

    Sometimes I actually say "I would liked to have....". It sounds more formal to me than with the two 'haves'.
     

    themaincamarojoe

    New Member
    United states/english
    Creo depende en lo que tipo de ingles. Pero, para mi, " I would have liked to give you it on Friday" sonaría mejor si está "I'd like to have given it to you on Friday", pero que quisiste decir es bien tambien.
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    themaincamarojoe said:
    Creo depende en lo que tipo de ingles. Pero, para mi, " I would have liked to give you it on Friday" sonaría mejor si está "I'd like to have given it to you on Friday", pero que quisiste decir es bien tambien.
    I agree. "I'd like to have given it to you" might not be entirely semantically correct, but it's what many native English speakers say. "I'd liked to have given it to you" doesn't sound right to my BE ears, but then again, I doubt that I'd notice the 'd'.


    I hope you don't mind if I make some suggestions about your Spanish; as far as I can tell, just about everybody here welcomes feedback, myself included. And, for me, the great thing about these forums is that we all learn from each other.

    Creo depende en lo que tipo de ingles.
    Creo que depende en cuál tipo de inglés.
    One would normally say "I think that": "creo que" or "me parece que" ("it appears to me"). "Lo que" is used for "which" when it is used in a phrase which qualifies the object or complement in a sentence. (At least, I think that's the correct use; maybe someone who's better at Spanish grammar could correct me if I'm wrong). For example, "Éste es el libro lo que me prestó Juan": "This is the book which Juan lent me". Lastly, I'm not sure if 'tipo' would be the most appropriate word to use here, but that's because I'd probably say "form of English" rather than "type of English", so it's just a personal preference.

    Pero, para mi, " I would have liked to give you it on Friday" sonaría mejor si está "I'd like to have given it to you on Friday", pero que quisiste decir es bien tambien

    When you use a construction like this with the conditional tense, 'sonaría', the other verb is in the subjunctive, so 'esté' rather than 'está'. In fact, I'd say it probably should be the imperfect subjunctive 'estuviera' rather than the present subjunctive. If I'm wrong, maybe one of our hispanohablante amigos will put me right. Also, this is one of those situations where you use 'lo que' rather than 'que' to mean 'which' or 'what': "pero lo que quisiste decir". Lastly, it might just have been a typo but 'mi' means 'my' whereas 'mí' with an accent means 'me'.

    I hope all this is of help and I'd welcome any feedback should you disagree.
     

    charmedboi82

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Para los hispanohablantes:

    (el contexto)
    Creo que depende en cuál tipo de inglés.

    Cual tipo o que tipo?

    Con cual suena mejor? Cual o que?


    ----
    Otra preguntita, sin mas contexto, cual de los dos frases siguientes les suena mejor? Y, por que? Si ambas les parecen bien, diganme cual es la diferencia entre ellas.

    Que te gusta mas?
    Cual te gusta mas?

    Tengo un comentario sobre estas dos frases pero quiero ver lo que digan antes de colocarlo aqui.
     

    Edison49

    Member
    Chile Español
    refiriéndome exclusivamente al contexto que señalas del post anterior al tuyo yo diría: "Depende del tipo de inglés" (tanto "cual" como "que" no me convence aplicarlo en este caso)


    Con respecto a tu segunda pregunta:
    ¿Qué te gusta más? por ej: ¿quedarte en casa los fines de semana o salir a fiestas? (yo lo aplicaría a situaciones)

    ¿Cuál te gusta más? por ej: ¿el (auto, sombrero, etc.) rojo o el azul? (aplicado a cosas)
     
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