Me presentó a su novio (direct or indirect object?)

jfgor

New Member
English-USA
Hola,
I often get confused with the DOP and IDOP. I understand the difference but sometimes I have trouble with which is which. For example
I have a sentence Ella me presentó a su novio, and I have seen similar sentences too, but I don't know if 'me' is the direct object or the indirect object, or if su novio is the direct object and me is the indirect object.

I have been told that the sentence translates as 'She introduced me to her boyfriend'. And I don't know why it is not translated (as it is written Spanish) She introduced her boyfriend to me.
The way the Spanish sentence is written doesn't seem to translate to what I have studied, Because I would think that if the English sentence said 'She introduced me to her boyfriend', the Spanish sentence would read Ella le me presentó a su novio.
Please help, I am so confused and Muchas gracias to all that help.
 
Last edited:
  • Ferrol

    Senior Member
    Spanish.España
    Ella me presentó su novio : she introduced her boyfriend to me
    She introduced me to her boyfriend : Ella me presentó a su novio
    Yes I've just realised that both English sentences translate into Spanish nearly in the same way
     

    Ferrol

    Senior Member
    Spanish.España
    I think the above would have to be "Ella se me presentó," although the "se" may simply be unnecessary.
    "Ella le me presentó a su novia" no se entendería por aquí
    Ella se me presentó a su ¿novia? (¿Son lesbianas?) suena también muy raro (lesbianas o no)
    Ella me presentó a su novia , sería lo correcto : She introduced me to her girlfriend
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Ella le me presentó a su novia" no se entendería por aquí
    Ella se me presentó a su ¿novia? (¿Son lesbianas?) suena también muy raro (lesbianas o no)
    Ella me presentó a su novia , sería lo correcto : She introduced me to her girlfriend
    Thanks, Ferrol.
     

    jfgor

    New Member
    English-USA
    Gracias, I am sorry that I made a typing mistake, as it should be 'novio'. I edited it. However I am still confused is novio the direct object? The translation to English does not set well in my mine.

    Are you saying it is the context that matters? I take that to mean that both English sentences are said the same in Spanish?
    I am sorry if I sound so 'dense'. Thank you to all that replied.
     

    Ferrol

    Senior Member
    Spanish.España
    Gracias, I am sorry that I made a typing mistake, as it should be 'novio'. I edited it. However I am still confused is novio the direct object? The translation to English does not set well in my mine.

    Are you saying it is the context that matters? I take that to mean that both English sentences are said the same in Spanish?
    I am sorry if I sound so 'dense'. Thank you to all that replied.
    Nearly the same but not quite the same.It's the presence or absence of an "a" which makes the difference (see my first post)
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    George DeMello's Español contemporáneo (3rd ed., p. 124)* says...
    If the two people involved are represented as a pronoun and a noun, the pronoun is an indirect object, and the noun, a direct object [... So] both "I introduced Jose to her" and "I introduced her to Jose" will be normally rendered in Spanish as "Le presentá a José".
    What a relief! You don't have to worry about whose status is higher and introducing whom to whom!
    If both are pronouns, remember that the order of these is not necessarily "R.I.D." (reflexive > indirect > direct), as we tell beginners,
    but rather 2nd-person > 1st-person > 3rd-person.
    So there is never "le me" or "me te".

    *The 2nd ed. (p. 103)—available in Google Books—also treats this, but not in such detail.
     

    jfgor

    New Member
    English-USA
    Gracias again for all the replies, I am so happy to be getting answers. I am new to the forums too. Cenzontle, Your information is so surprising. I think students like me, and are curious, bang our heads trying to figure something out with our English brain. I really think some of this is seeping in. LOL. I am not sure about the the
    2nd-person > 1st-person > 3rd-person comment but I will research that .

    I am just grateful that all of you responded.
     

    camachoe

    Member
    Mexico (Spanish)
    This kind of sentences could be interpreted in two totally different ways.
    Let's think in three persons, say me, you, and your boyfriend.
    "Me presentó a su novio" can either mean that
    1) You told your boyfriend: "Hey, this is Juan" ( in which "me" is a direct object and "su novio" indirect object) or
    2) You told me "Hey, this is my boyfriend" (in which "my boyfriend" is the direct object and I am the indirect object).

    This sentence bears this special difficulty because the Spanish pronoun "me" is used to indicate either rect or indirect object AND "a" is used next to a third person to convert it either in a direct or indirect object. "Le pegó a su novio" = She hit her boyfriend.
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Right, context matters. What gets in the way is that "a" is used for direct objects that are people (or personalized entities) and also for indirect objects. So, in a sentence like "me presentó a su novio," syntax can't discern whether that "a" is marking a direct object or an indirect object. To avoid ambiguity, usage books recommend dropping the "a" that marks the direct object, so that me presentó su novio means She introduced her boyfriend to me, while me presentó a su novio (with "a" to mark the indirect object) means She introduced me to her boyfriend.
     

    Ferrol

    Senior Member
    Spanish.España
    Right, context matters. What gets in the way is that "a" is used for direct objects that are people (or personalized entities) and also for indirect objects. So, in a sentence like "me presentó a su novio," syntax can't discern whether that "a" is marking a direct object or an indirect object. To avoid ambiguity, usage books recommend dropping the "a" that marks the direct object, so that me presentó su novio means She introduced her boyfriend to me, while me presentó a su novio (with "a" to mark the indirect object) means She introduced me to her boyfriend.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:
     

    duvija

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Right. With 'presentar' things get muggy.
    Juan le presentó a Pedro a María. (you don't have to care about IO, because of that 'personal a'. And you still won't know who was introduced to who(m) )
     
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