Me too, you too - responding to "Nice to meet you."

Elatek

New Member
Polish, Poland
That's me once more,
When someone says " Nice to meet you" can we answer " me too" or " you too" or " and you" meaning ' Nice to meet you too" ?
Or is the reply '' Nice to meet you too" the only correct one?
Greetengs from Poland,
 
  • dwipper

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    “And you” sounds perfectly natural to me. “You too” has always seemed a little awkward to me, but I do hear it from native speakers. I wouldn't use “Me too,” though--it sounds like you mean “It's nice to meet me too,” which lacks a certain logical progression (though I could see how this might be useful for meeting to your alter ego in the mirror for the first time).

    Really, you can get away with saying a lot of things, as long as they make some kind of sense. Most people expect that whatever you say after their greeting is some sort of reciprocation of the sentiment.
     

    jdenson

    Senior Member
    USA / English
    That's me once more,
    When someone says " Nice to meet you" can we answer " me too" or " you too" or " and you" meaning ' Nice to meet you too" ?
    Or is the reply '' Nice to meet you too" the only correct one?
    Greetengs from Poland,
    Some alternatives:
    It's my pleasure (or just, my pleasure)
    The pleasure is mine.
    JD
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    Aussies are experts at illogical greetings and responses. We use them all the time.
    The most common response to 'Nice to meet you' is 'Same here'.

    .,,
     

    Snappy_is_here

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    "you too" is short for "nice meeting you too"
    this is the most natural thing to say, i think.
    or you could say "likewise," meaning that you say the same thing in return.

    if you say "me too" then it could mean that it is nice to meet yourself.

    This might be a belated question, but do native speakers of English ever say "me too" in that situation? I found a weblog reporting that "me too" is used by native speakers of English, but I can't believe that.
     

    myrmidon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This might be a belated question, but do native speakers of English ever say "me too" in that situation? I found a weblog reporting that "me too" is used by native speakers of English, but I can't believe that.
    Sometimes some of us do find ourselves saying that, but then we realize we have made a mistake, and are embarrassed and correct ourselves.

    I think it happens because in many cases "me too" is the way we express agreement in casual speech.
    Jack: I like ice cream.
    Jill: Me too.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    In the present context, I might say "for me too" or "you too" but not plain "me too". I agree with Dwipper's Post #30.

    On the question of to meet vs. meeting:

    It was nice to meet you. [I wanted to meet you and am glad I did.]
    "To meet" sees the moment of meeting.

    It was nice meeting you. [I am glad I met you.]
    "Meeting" sees the entirety of the meeting.
     

    Snappy_is_here

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    In the present context, I might say "for me too" or "you too" but not plain "me too". I agree with Dwipper's Post #30.

    On the question of to meet vs. meeting:

    It was nice to meet you. [I wanted to meet you and am glad I did.]
    "To meet" sees the moment of meeting.

    It was nice meeting you. [I am glad I met you.]
    "Meeting" sees the entirety of the meeting.

    Thank you!
     

    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    Hi All

    So, are '' Nice to meet you too '' and '' Me too '' used both in informal and formal introductions or should '' Nice to meet you too '' be preferred to '' Me too '' both formally and informally? For example between two students which one is used? I've heard that '' Nice to meet you too '' is better than '' Me too '' in this context. Regards post #4 the two alternative are only used in formal introductions, is that correct? And what about '' you too '' used nowadays?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    "Me too" really does not make sense here:

    It's nice to meet me too.:confused:
    I too am nice to meet you.
    :confused:

    And "Nice to meet you too" seems to be saying "of course meeting me is a pleasure, and by the way, meeting you is a pleasure too".

    So I prefer "My pleasure" for the context given.
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English - U.S. (Texas)
    "Me too" really does not make sense here:

    It's nice to meet me too.:confused:
    I too am nice to meet you.
    :confused:

    And "Nice to meet you too" seems to be saying "of course meeting me is a pleasure, and by the way, meeting you is a pleasure too".
    Entirely logical, but wouldn't you agree that in casual speech, quite a lot of people would say "Me too" just out of habit.

    And it actually doesn't bother me that much. It strikes me as a (slightly sloppy, yes) way to say "I reciprocate the emotion you have just expressed."

    As somebody pointed out above, though, "Same here" is likely the best option, in informal contexts, at least for me.
     

    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    And "Nice to meet you too" seems to be saying "of course meeting me is a pleasure, and by the way, meeting you is a pleasure too".
    I don’t interpret it this way at all. “Nice to meet you too” sounds completely acceptable to me.
    "Same here" is likely the best option, in informal contexts, at least for me.
    Agreed, this is the shortest way of answering.
     

    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    Regards post #12, I've heard that when it comes to '' my pleasure '', it only refers to formal language. I don't think that two students will use '' my pleasure '' if they are being introduced each other. What do all of you think about it?
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English - U.S. (Texas)
    Regards post #12, I've heard that when it comes to '' my pleasure '', it only refers to formal language. I don't think that two students will use '' my pleasure '' if they are being introduced each other. What do all of you think about it?
    Honestly, at least in the U.S., students probably wouldn't normally say "Nice to meet you" either. The more typical exchange would be something like:

    John: Hey, this is my friend Bill.
    Mike: (extends hand to Bill) Hey. How's it going?
    Bill: (shaking Mike's hand) Hey.

    (Maybe I'm exaggerating, but not by much.)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I'd go for 'Nice to meet you too'. If I want it to shorten it, I might go for 'Likewise', but it sounds a bit half-hearted.
     

    rino delbello

    Senior Member
    italian
    Hi All

    According to your point of view natkretep, would you use '' Likewise '' formally instead? At any rate, the adjective '' half-hearted '' seems a piece of advice to rule it out both informally and formally. Can you clear this point please?
     
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    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    By 'half-hearted', I mean that the reply doesn't seem very enthusiastic, and it feels almost perfunctory. I think it is fine for a formal context.
     
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