meal/grain/oats

DeLaMancha

Senior Member
Français de France
Bonjour,
Quelle est la différence entre ces trois termes qui sont indifféremment employés dans le texte suivant ('Famine' de Liam O'Flaherty) :
"How could I pay you that price ?" Hynes was saying, as he glared furtively at Hernon from under the rim of his hat. "Sure the meal itself is only eleven and ninepence a hundred. Is it asking the same for the grain you are ? Can't you be satisfied with what everybody else is getting ?"
.....
"I'm afraid of no man," said Hernon, spitting between his chest and the edge of the counter. "If the people had courage same as I have, they wouldn't be robbed. But what can one man do ?Take the damn oats and may they choke whoever eats them."

Merci de votre réponse.
 
  • Miaowmix

    Senior Member
    Quebec - Français
    Hello

    Meal is used to describe ground seeds or grasses, of any origin. It of course refers to the idea of a meal, one that you eat. One can often feed meal to an animal, although it's not exclusively used in this context.

    Grain is, well, grain. Be it it seeds from grasses, fruits or what not, it can be caleld grain. Although, in usual speech, it specifically refers to grain coming from cereal - Maize, Corn, and, of course oats.

    Oats, then, of course, is a type of cereal, particularly enjoyed by horses, but also human beings. Oats are like the cookies of horses, they totally dig it. It is usually used in the plural.

    Meal is the least formal of the terms. When an individual eats meal, it usually refers to a person not having much to eat, and thus eating the kind of paste that is formed. So it totally makes sense in the context of the book. As for the grain, one could imagine that in this context, grain refers to a better quality cereal than the meal.

    En français, meal est traduit le plus souvent par semoule. Oats, par avoine. Et grain par céréales.


    Voilà!
     

    DeLaMancha

    Senior Member
    Français de France
    Hello

    Meal is used to describe ground seeds or grasses, of any origin. It of course refers to the idea of a meal, one that you eat. One can often feed meal to an animal, although it's not exclusively used in this context.

    Grain is, well, grain. Be it it seeds from grasses, fruits or what not, it can be caleld grain. Although, in usual speech, it specifically refers to grain coming from cereal - Maize, Corn, and, of course oats.

    Oats, then, of course, is a type of cereal, particularly enjoyed by horses, but also human beings. Oats are like the cookies of horses, they totally dig it. It is usually used in the plural.

    Meal is the least formal of the terms. When an individual eats meal, it usually refers to a person not having much to eat, and thus eating the kind of paste that is formed. So it totally makes sense in the context of the book. As for the grain, one could imagine that in this context, grain refers to a better quality cereal than the meal.

    En français, meal est traduit le plus souvent par semoule. Oats, par avoine. Et grain par céréales.


    Voilà!

    Merci beaucoup Miaowmix pour toutes ces précisions. A bientôt
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    According to Wikipedia:



    The hundredweight or centum weight (abbreviated cwt) is a unit of mass defined in terms of the pound (lb). Its British definition is not the same as that used in North America. The two are distinguished by speaking of the long hundredweight and the short hundredweight:
    • In Imperial units, a (long) hundredweight is defined as 112 lb, which is equal to 50.802345 kg.[1]
    • In U.S. customary units, a (short) hundredweight is defined as 100 lb, which is equal to 45.359237 kg.[2] This is also the usual hundredweight in Canada. The short hundredweight is also called a cental, especially in places which normally use the long hundredweight.
    Under both conventions, twenty hundredweights are in a ton: the long ton of 2240 lb and the short ton of 2000 lb. The long ton is approximately equal to the metric tonne of 1000 kg (2205 lb).​
    Comme quoi: 50 kilos.
     

    DeLaMancha

    Senior Member
    Français de France
    According to Wikipedia:



    The hundredweight or centum weight (abbreviated cwt) is a unit of mass defined in terms of the pound (lb). Its British definition is not the same as that used in North America. The two are distinguished by speaking of the long hundredweight and the short hundredweight:
    • In Imperial units, a (long) hundredweight is defined as 112 lb, which is equal to 50.802345 kg.[1]
    • In U.S. customary units, a (short) hundredweight is defined as 100 lb, which is equal to 45.359237 kg.[2] This is also the usual hundredweight in Canada. The short hundredweight is also called a cental, especially in places which normally use the long hundredweight.
    Under both conventions, twenty hundredweights are in a ton: the long ton of 2240 lb and the short ton of 2000 lb. The long ton is approximately equal to the metric tonne of 1000 kg (2205 lb).
    Comme quoi: 50 kilos.

    Ah ben merci Keith ! Quand j'ai vu tous ces liens, j'ai eu peur que tu ne me donnes pas la réponse ;)
     
    Top