meandering around TO a defense of his administration

LQZ

Senior Member
Mandarin
“Pakistan is an enormous country; it is a strategically important country,” Mr. Obama began, meandering around to a defense of his administration. New York Times (subscription, free)

Dear all,

Could you please tell me whether I can leave out the preposition "To" without changing the meaning of the above? If not, what is the difference between meandering around to and meandering around? Thanks.


LQZ
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    You need to -- it's a direction. He was walking to the store. He was driving to New York. He was meandering around to a defense of his administration. (An unusual usage, by the way.)

    You could say meandering around if you were speaking of someone who was just wandering around with no destination (which is where the "to" leads you -- to a destination). This, too, strikes me as a little unusual and I would normally use wandering: When they found the boy, he was just wandering around, looking lost -- which he was, of course.
     

    LQZ

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    You need to -- it's a direction. He was walking to the store. He was driving to New York. He was meandering around to a defense of his administration. (An unusual usage, by the way.)

    You could say meandering around if you were speaking of someone who was just wandering around with no destination (which is where the "to" leads you -- to a destination). This, too, strikes me as a little unusual and I would normally use wandering: When they found the boy, he was just wandering around, looking lost -- which he was, of course.
    Thank you, Mr Copyright. I've got it. :)
     
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