meaning of 'with nothing at all over'

oh_seoul

Member
Korea
At present I can just make my way, with nothing at all over; but then I live in a very expensive flat.

<from 'two bottles of relish' by Lord Dunsany>

My understanding of the above sentence is "I can make my living, but I don't have anything with me such as money or property".

Is it correct ?
Is it a common expression in English ?
(the 'at all' could be omitted, and then 'with nothing over' could be used as a common phrase?)


What is the role of 'over' in the above phrase ?

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:
  • stez

    Senior Member
    english - australia
    It means that after I have paid all of my expenses there is nothing left for saving or for non-essential items.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree with Stez about the meaning.

    It is not a common expression, at least in US English (I can't speak for the UK or Australia). We'd say, "I can just cover my monthly expenses, with nothing left over."
     

    stez

    Senior Member
    english - australia
    [QUOTE We'd say, "I can just cover my monthly expenses, with nothing left over."[/QUOTE]

    Likewise in this part of the world!
     
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