means ‘you should not’ and <it> is the opening phrase

sofiahumada

Member
Castellano, Argentina
Hi everyone!
I'm having some trouble with this sentences: Additionally, The Garden of Love states ‘Thou shalt not’, which means ‘you should not’ and is the opening phrase of seven of the Ten Commandments in the Old Testament.

I would like to know if I have to add an 'it' between 'and' and 'is'. I don't know if which applies for both clauses or not.

Thanks for your time! :)
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    When you add "it":
    "Additionally, The Garden of Love states ‘Thou shalt not’, which means ‘you should not’, and it is the opening phrase of seven of the Ten Commandments in the Old Testament."

    If you add "it", it would seem to refer back to the subject of the sentence: "The Garden of Love".
    I think I might leave your sentence as it was - or possibly add a comma and a second "which". Wait for other opinions though.:)"

    "Additionally, The Garden of Love states ‘Thou shalt not’, which means ‘you should not’, and which is the opening phrase of seven of the Ten Commandments in the Old Testament."
     
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