Meant to be / signified to be

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Trinity2000

Member
Spanish - Argentina
Hi, I would like to know which word fits better in this case: "She (a writer) invented a detective, Hercule, who is _______ to be Belgian and can hardly speak English unless the author finds it necessary to."
I am between meant and signified, but the excercise also gives me the words imagined and expressed. I think the word is meant because I already know the phrase "be meant to be" but not with that meaning so I am not sure.
Thank you!
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I agree with you; of the two, I would use 'meant'.
    She invented a detective, Hercule, who is meant to be Belgian and can hardly speak English unless the author finds it necessary to.​
    This implies that Hercule's portrayal as a Belgian is not completely convincing.

    (I might have said 'intended to be.')
     

    forHisglory

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    How about "Who is supposed to be".
    "Intended to be" is good, too, as Cagey suggested at the bottom of his post.
    " I do not think that "Signify" gives the meaning that you speak of above.
    Hope it helps.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Although it isn't your question, note that there is a serious problem with "...can hardly speak English unless the author finds it necessary to." Agatha Christie always found it necessary to speak English in her daily life, but that did not change how M. Poirot spoke. What you mean is "... can hardly speak English unless the author finds it necessary for him to do so."
     
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